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Not to be confused with the Malawian 10 kwacha coin.
10 kwacha
Zambia 10 kwacha 1992
1992 circulation coin
General information
Country

Flag of Zambia Zambia

Value

10.00 kwacha

Years

19792000

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 27.22 g (1979-1997 silver)
  • 54.43 g (1980 piedfort)
  • 5.1 g (1992)
  • 20 g (1994)
  • 27.34 (2000)
Diameter
  • 40 mm (1979-2000)
  • 24.3 mm (1992)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

medallic

Edge

reeded

Obverse

see text

Reverse

see text

v · d · e

The 10 kwacha coin is a former circulation and commemorative coin issued by the Republic of Zambia from 1979 to 2000. The first piece of the denomination was struck in two varieties in 1979, in recognition of the conservation of the Taita falcon (Falco fasciinucha) in Zambia. It was followed in 1980 by another coin, also produced in two varieties, commemorating the International Year of the Child. Six years later, in 1986, the 20th anniversary of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) was celebrated on another 10 kwacha coin, and subsequently, in 1989, the 70th anniversary of Save the Children was also memorialized on a piece. The only circulation coin of the denomination was introduced in 1992, and was solely produced that year. Since then, no 10 kwacha pieces have been made for general use. Nearly five years after the last commemorative coin was introduced, in 1994 a piece was minted for the that year's World Cup, along with two unissued patterns. The final type was introduced in 1997, in celebration of UNICEF, and was later struck again in a different metal in 2000.

All of the coins were distributed by the Bank of Zambia (BoZ). Under contract, each of the commemoratives was struck at the British Royal Mint, and the circulation piece was produced at the Royal Canadian Mint. Prior to their eventual demonetization, all of the coins carried a legal tender face value of 10.00 Zambian kwacha. While the 1992 piece saw common use for a period, most of the commemoratives, as non-circulating legal tender, did not enter general circulation.

CoinsEdit

Commemorative coins (1979–2000)Edit

Conservation coins (1979)Edit

The Taita falcon (Falco fasciinucha) is a rare species of falcon native to parts of central and eastern Africa, including portions of Zambia. Of particular concern to conservationists is the bird's decreasing population trend, causing it to appear various times in the IUCN Red List. In recognition of the conservation efforts for local fauna, Zambia issued a series of three commemorative coins in 1979, consisting of denominations of 5, 10, and 250 kwacha. The 10 kwacha piece, which focuses on the Taita falcon, was struck in two varieties: one weighing 31.65 grams and a proof weighing 35 grams. In spite of these disparities, both have a common composition of .925 fine silver. They also have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and undecorated.

Displayed in the middle of the obverse is a right-facing bust of Kenneth Kaunda (1924–), the President of Zambia from 1964 to 1991. Such a likeness, designed by British sculptor Norman Sillman (1921–2013), made its first appearance on a commemorative pre-decimal 5 shilling coin in 1965. From then until Kaunda's fall from power, the same image of the president would be included on most Zambian coins. Printed above Kaunda's portrait, extending in a clockwise direction along the upper rim of the piece, is the state title "ZAMBIA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1979", is inscribed in the opposite direction along the obverse's bottom periphery, under the illustration of the president. Featured at the upper center of the reverse is a depiction of a Taita falcon flying to the lower right. It is accompanied below by the face value "10 KWACHA", which is presented on two lines in a large, narrow font. The numeral "10" is written horizontally, while the word "KWACHA" is arched in the direction of the coin's bottom rim.

A total of 6,506 examples of the 1979 conservation coin were produced, including 3,250 pieces weighing 31.65 grams and 3,256 measuring 35 grams.

International Year of the Child coins (1980)Edit

Zambia 10 kwacha 1980 IYC

1980 commemorative coin

In an attempt to draw attention to some of the issues affecting children worldwide, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared 1979 the International Year of the Child. In celebration of this event, Zambia issued a commemorative 10 kwacha coin in 1980. Two varieties were produced: a normal-sized piece weighing 27.22 grams and a thicker, heavier piedfort measuring 54.43 grams. Both are composed of .925 fine silver and have a diameter of 40 millimeters. They have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims on both sides of each coin are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the pieces is virtually identical to those of the 1979 conservation commemoratives: Sillman's likeness of President Kaunda appears in the center, with "ZAMBIA" printed clockwise along the upper rim, and the Gregorian date inscribed counterclockwise at the bottom periphery. The only notable difference on the 1980 pieces is the date, which was adjusted to reflect the correct year of production. Featured in the middle of the reverse is an illustration of three young Zambian children – two boys and one girl – playing on playground equipment. A small United Nations emblem – which consists of a world map surrounded by olive branches – is engraved to the left of the image. Displayed to the right is the logo of the International Year of the Child – which shows a child embracing an adult between two branches. A small symbol is additionally present near the bottom of the depiction. Extending in a counterclockwise direction from the left to right peripheries of the reverse is the caption "INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE CHILD". The value is rendered as "KWACHA 10" at the top of the piece, with the word "KWACHA" arched clockwise along the upper rim, and the numeral "10" printed horizontally below on its own line, between the two boys in the aforementioned illustration.

A total of 12,076 examples were produced, including 12,000 normal-sized pieces and 76 piedforts. All of the coins were struck with a proof finish.

World Wildlife Fund coin (1986)Edit

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the world's largest international conservation organization, was founded in 1961 in Switzerland. A year following its establishment, the WWF established its first office in the British colony of Northern Rhodesia, which would become the current Republic of Zambia in 1964. The office remains in operation to this day, and continues to perform various activities to conserve Zambia's biodiversity. In 1986, Zambia introduced a 10 kwacha coin celebrating the WWF and its 25th anniversary. Such a piece is composed of .925 fine silver, weighs 27.22 grams, and measures 40 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape.

Aside from the date, which reads "1986", the obverse of the piece is virtually identical to those of the earlier conservation and International Year of the Child commemoratives. Kenneth Kaunda appears in the middle, with the word "ZAMBIA" printed above along the upper rim, and the date inscribed below at the coin's bottom periphery. A white-winged flufftail (Sarothrura ayresi), a very rare bird found in Ethiopia and parts of southern Africa, is displayed at the upper center of the reverse, standing on a mound of earth and plants. The bird was first assessed as vulnerable by the IUCN Red List in 1988, and was eventually uplisted to endangered status in 1994, and critically endangered status in 2013. Vagrant flufftails have been reported in Zambia in the past, although the validity of such claims remains uncertain. Printed on two lines below the coin's depiction of the bird is the face value "10 KWACHA", with the numeral displayed horizontally and the following word arched along the bottom rim.

A total of 25,000 examples of the coin were produced, all with a proof finish.

Save the Children coin (1989)Edit

Save the Children is an international organization that promotes children's rights in developing countries. Since its inception in 1919, the organization has built offices in over 120 nations worldwide. Save the Children's first office in Zambia was planted in in 1989, coinciding with the organizations 70th anniversary. That year, Zambia authorized the production of a collectors' 10 kwacha piece to commemorate the occasion. It is composed of .925 fine silver, weighs 27.22 grams, and measures 40 millimeters in diameter. The coin has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the piece resembles that of the earlier 10 kwacha coins: President Kaunda's likeness appears in the center, with the state title "ZAMBIA" printed along the rim above and the Gregorian date "1989" arched along the periphery below. An official document by the Bank of Zambia detailing its collectors' coins states that "Zambian children are...encouraged to participate in the growing and harvesting of crops". This is represented in the middle of the piece's reverse, which shows an illustration of a young Zambian boy in a cornfield, picking an ear of corn (Zea mays). The caption "SAVE THE CHILDREN" is printed above in a clockwise direction at the coin's boundary. It is accompanied by the face value "10 KWACHA", which appears in the opposite direction along the bottom rim.

A total of 20,000 coins were produced, all with a proof finish.

FIFA World Cup coins (1994)Edit

The 15th FIFA World Cup was held in the United States during the summer of 1994. In an attempt to compete, the Zambia national soccer (football) team participated in the CAF qualifier that year. By winning in its group, Zambia ultimately advanced to the final round of the CAF tournament, but failed to qualify after being defeated by Morocco. In commemoration of the World Cup and the country's participation, Zambia introduced a commemorative 10 kwacha coin and four 2,000 kwacha pieces in 1994. The 10 kwacha coin was produced in three varieties, including two rejected patterns and the issued product. The issued examples are composed of .999 fine silver and weigh 20 grams. One of the patterns is made of cupronickel, while the other is silver. All three varieties have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and decorated with a dentillated border.

Featured in the center of the obverse is the coat of arms of Zambia – which consists of a central escutcheon decorated with wavy lines, supported by a Zambian man in Western garb and a woman in traditional attire, both standing on solid earth. Buildings, an ear of corn, and a plains zebra (Equus quagga) are additionally displayed on the earth, and a scroll bearing the national motto "ONE NATION ONE ZAMBIA" is shown below. Surmounting the escutcheon in the arms are a crossing pickaxe and hoe and an African fish eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer). After Kaunda's fall from power in 1991, such an image replaced his likeness on most Zambian coins. Printed clockwise along the obverse's upper boundary, above the rendition of the arms, is the state title "ZAMBIA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1994", is inscribed horizontally in the middle of the coin, the first two digits (19) separated from the last two (94) by the arms. Displayed on two lines at the bottom of the piece, arched in the direction of the coin's lower rim, is the face value "10 KWACHA". Appearing in the middle of the reverse is an image of a Zambian soccer player kicking a ball in midair. Such an illustration is also included on one of the 2,000 kwacha pieces distributed by the Bank of Zambia. The legend "XV WORLD CUP 1994 - UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" is written in a clockwise direction along the reverse's outer rim, extending from the lower left to right boundaries. An indicator of the coin's purity is included in the field between the image of the player and the beginning of the legend. On issued pieces, it simply reads "999", identifying a silver purity of 999. Patterns, regardless of composition, instead bear "999 CuNi" (abbreviated for "cupronickel"), which is inscribed on two lines.

The total mintages of the coins are currently unknown. Issued specimens were struck with a proof finish.

UNICEF coins (1997–2000)Edit

Zambia 10 kwacha 2000 UNICEF CuNi

2000 cupronickel piece

The United Nations Children's Fund, more commonly known as UNICEF, is a United Nations Program that provides humanitarian aid to children and mothers in developing countries. Since its establishment in 1946, the program has worked in various countries around the world, including Zambia. In 1997, the Bank of Zambia commemorated UNICEF with the production of a .925 silver 10 kwacha piece, which would later be struck again in cupronickel in 2000. The silver examples weigh approximately 27.22 grams, while cupronickel specimens are slightly heavier, measuring 27.34 grams. Both varieties share a diameter of 40 millimeters, have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of the obverse and reverse are raised and undecorated.

The coin's obverse features the coat of arms of Zambia in its center, with the state title "ZAMBIA" inscribed clockwise in small font along the rim above, and the Gregorian date of minting printed in the opposite direction at the periphery below. On 1997 pieces, the date is much smaller and closer to the coin's boundary than on the cupronickel examples of 2000. Displayed in the middle of the reverse is an image of three Zambian boys playing soccer, with trees, a mountain, and several homes in the background. The logo of UNICEF – consisting of a globe superimposed by a mother and child, surrounded by olive branches – appears near the top of the coin, between the two leftmost boys in the central image. Written below, separated by a solid horizontal line, is the caption "unicef". The legend "FOR THE CHILDREN OF THE WORLD" is inscribed along the coin's upper periphery, extending clockwise from the left to right sides of the reverse. It is accompanied by the face value "10 KWACHA", which is printed at the coin's bottom boundary in a counterclockwise direction.

A total of 25,000 silver coins were struck in 1997, all bearing a proof finish. The mintage of the cupronickel pieces, struck solely with a matte finish in 2000, is currently unknown.

Circulation piece (1992)Edit

Statistics published by the Bank of Zambia reveal a 4,000 percent increase in the consumer price index (CPI) in Zambia from 1980 to 1990. As a result of this high inflation, the purchasing power of the kwacha was greatly reduced, causing coins and banknotes of lower denominations to disappear from circulation. In 1992, the Bank of Zambia authorized the production of a new series of circulation coins in higher values of 25 and 50 ngwee, and 1, 5, and 10 kwacha. The 10 kwacha piece (pictured above), which replaced the banknote of the same denomination, is composed of brass, weighs approximately 5.1 grams, and measures 24.3 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and undecorated.

As one of the first circulation coins after Kenneth Kaunda's fall from power in 1991, the 1992 10 kwacha coin does not show the former president's likeness. Instead, featured in its place in the center of the obverse is the coat of arms of Zambia, with the state title "ZAMBIA" inscribed clockwise along the rim above, and the Gregorian date of minting, "1992", engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below. An illustration of a black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) facing ½ right is displayed at the upper left portion of the reverse. Such an animal is native to much of Zambia and other nearby countries, existing in small numbers in the wild. The numeral "10", indicating the coin's face value, is printed horizontally in a bolded, serifed font to the right of the rhinoceros. Its written equivalent, "TEN KWACHA", is engraved on two lines near the bottom of the coin, with the first word shown to the right of the rhinoceros' legs, and the second printed beneath the illustration of the animal.

The total mintage of the circulation coin is currently unknown. According to the Bank of Zambia, a small number of proofs were placed into proof sets.

ReferencesEdit

 v · d · e
Zambian kwacha
Banknotes Current: 2 K5 K10 K20 K50 K100 K
Former: 50 n1 K • 2 K • 5 K • 10 K • 20 K • 50 K • 100 K • 500 K1,000 K5,000 K10,000 K20,000 K50,000 K
Coins Current: 5 n10 n50 n1 K
Former: 1 n2 n • 5 n • 10 n • 20 n25 n • 50 n • 1 K • 5 K10 K20 K75 K100 K200 K250 K500 K1,000 K2,000 K2,500 K4,000 K5,000 K10,000 K20,000 K25,000 K40,000 K50,000 K100,000 K500,000 K
Miscellaneous Bank of ZambiaDe La RueKwachaNgweeRebasingZambian pound

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