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Yugoslav 5 dinar coin

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This article is about the Yugoslav coin struck in various types from 1945 to 2002. For Serbian coins of the same denomination, see Serbian 5 dinar coin (disambiguation). For Macedonian coins of a similar denomination, see Macedonian 5 denar coin.
5 dinara
Yugoslavia 5 dinara 2002
2002 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR/FPR Yugoslavia
Flag of the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia DF Yugoslavia

Used by

Flag of Serbia Serbia (2006–2010)
Flag of Serbia Republic of Serbia (2000–2006)
Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia (1992–1993)
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR/FPR Yugoslavia (1945–1992)
Flag of the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia DF Yugoslavia (1945)

Value
Years

19452002

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 6 g (1945)
  • 1.67 g (1953-1963)
  • 6.75 g (1970-1981)
  • 5.6 g (1982-1986)
  • 8.63 g (1990-1992)
  • 5.13 g (1992)
  • 4.67 g (1993)
  • 6.24 g (2000-2002)
Diameter
  • 26.5 mm (1945)
  • 24.6 mm (1953-1963)
  • 27.5 mm (1970-1981)
  • 24 mm (1982-1986, 2000-2002)
  • 28 mm (1990-1992)
  • 23 mm (1992)
  • 22 mm (1993)
Thickness
  • 1.5 mm (1945)
  • 1.6 mm (1953-1986, 1992-1993)
  • 2.2 mm (1990-1992)
  • 2 mm (2000-2002)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment
Edge
  • reeded (1945, 1970-1992, 2000-2002)
  • plain (1953-1963, 1992-1993)
Obverse

See text

Reverse

See text

v · d · e

The 5 dinar coin is a circulation and commemorative piece of Yugoslavia, a former Southeast European country that existed during the 20th and early 21st centuries. It was produced in 12 major types from 1945 to 2002: one under the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (DF Yugoslavia), one under the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia), seven under the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFR Yugoslavia), and three under the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FR Yugoslavia; later known as Serbia and Montenegro).

The first coin of the denomination was introduced in late 1945 by the provisional Democratic Federal Yugoslavia. It was then followed by the only 5 dinar piece of the short-lived Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (dated 1953) in 1954 and the first 5 dinar coin of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (dated 1963) in 1964. All three pieces initially held a legal tender face value equivalent to 5.00 Yugoslav Federation dinara. By the end of 1956, the 1945 piece was demonetized and withdrawn from circulation. Even though the Federation dinar was replaced in 1966 by the hard dinar, the later 5 dinar coins of the former currency remained valid for 0.05 hard dinara before being withdrawn in the middle of 1968.

Four circulation coins were then introduced under the new Yugoslav currency, each holding a value of 5.00 hard dinara. The first two, a 1970-dated commemorative celebrating the Food and Agriculture Organization and a standard circulation piece, were released in early 1971. The latter was then struck annually until its discontinuation in 1981. Another commemorative 5 dinar piece was then issued in 1975 on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the end of World War II (1939–1945) and the so-called "victory over fascism". This was followed in 1982 by a final standard circulation type of the hard dinar, which was produced annually until 1986. All of these coins were eventually demonetized in 1988.

Two pieces were then made under the Yugoslav convertible dinar. The first, a standard circulation coin, was released in early 1990 and manufactured until 1992. A non-circulating commemorative piece celebrating the 29th Chess Olympiad in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia (in modern Serbia), was then introduced later that year. The two coins carried a legal tender face value of 5.00 convertible dinara before being demonetized during the summer of 1992.

Another circulation 5 dinar piece was introduced by the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1992 as part of the Yugoslav reformed dinar. Holding a value of 5.00 dinara, the coin was eventually demonetized in 1993.

During the existence of the short-lived "1993" or October dinar in the latter half of 1993, one 5 dinar circulation piece was introduced. It circulated very briefly for a value of 5.00 "1993" dinara before being demonetized later during the same year.

No 5 dinar pieces were made under the "1994" or January dinar. The next coin of the denomination, part of the Yugoslav novi dinar, was then produced from 2000 to 2002. From 2000 until 2003, the piece circulated for a value of 5.00 novi dinara in the Republic of Serbia. From then, it continued to be used for 5.00 Serbian dinara until its demonetization in 2010.

All of the coins were distributed by the National Bank of Yugoslavia (now the National Bank of Serbia) and struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins (Serbo-Croatian: Zavod za izradu novčanica i kovanog novca) in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (in modern Serbia).

CoinsEdit

Coins of the Federation dinar (1945–1963)Edit

First circulation coin (1945)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1945

1945 coin

On March 25, 1941, Yugoslav Prime Minister Dragiša Cvetković (1893–1969; i.o. 1939–1941) signed the Tripartite Pact, thereby aligning the Kingdom of Yugoslavia with the Axis powers in World War II (1939–1945). Two days later, in response to this decision, opposition forces supported by the United Kingdom launched a successful coup d'état against the government of Cvetković and Prince Paul Karađorđević (1893–1976), who was overseeing the monarchical responsibilities of the country until King Peter II (1923–1970; r. 1934–1945) came of age. This initiative ultimately led to the Axis invasion and subsequent occupation of Yugoslavia later that year.

During the war, the Partisans led by Josip Broz Tito (1892–1980) engaged Axis forces in Yugoslavia on many occasions with the intent of liberating the country. The Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (DF Yugoslavia) was established by the resistance group on November 29, 1943, governing over Partisan-held territories until the end of World War II in Europe in the spring of 1945. From then, it remained the de facto government of liberated Yugoslavia until November 29, 1945, when the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia) was formed.

During mid to late 1945, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of a new series of Yugoslav coins in denominations of 50 para and 1, 2, and 5 dinara. As part of a new currency, these were intended to replace the pieces that circulated in Yugoslavia before the war. All four coins were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade. The 5 dinar piece of the series was released on November 4, 1945, and remained in circulation until December 31, 1956.

The coin, struck solely in 1945, is composed of an alloy of 97.5 percent zinc and measures 6 grams in mass, 26.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both sides of the piece are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

Featured in the middle of the obverse is the emblem of DF Yugoslavia – which consists of five lit torches surrounded by ears of wheat. A ribbon bearing the date "29·XI·1943" bounds the wheat, and a red star symbolizing communism appears above the entire emblem. Printed clockwise at the coin's upper boundary is the Cyrillic legend "ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" (Romanized: Jugoslavija), which is Serbo-Croatian for "Yugoslavia". The remainder of the rim is occupied by nine five-pointed stars.

The face value "5 DINARA" is engraved in the center of the reverse. The numeral and the following word are separated onto their own lines, the former displayed in significantly larger print than the latter. Written counterclockwise at the coin's lower periphery is the Gregorian date of minting, "1945". Fifteen five-pointed stars occupy the remainder of the piece's rim.

A total of 50,000,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were manufactured during a single year of production.

Second and third circulation coins (1953–1963)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1963

1963 coin

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1953

1953 coin

The Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia) was proclaimed on November 29, 1945, and formally established with the promulgation of a new constitution on January 31, 1946. It was later renamed to the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFR Yugoslavia) in accordance with the 1963 constitution. Both communist republics were initially led by Josip Broz Tito, who served from 1945 to 1963 as prime minister, or head of government, and from 1953 to his death in 1980 as Yugoslavia's first president, or head of state.

From 1953 to 1955, the second series of coins for the Yugoslav Federation dinar, which consisted of denominations of 50 para and 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 dinara, was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade. Because of Yugoslavia's name change in 1963, similar coins of the same denominations were also produced that year with updated legends. The 5 dinar piece of FPR Yugoslavia, although dated 1953, was not released into circulation until September 1, 1954. Similarly, the coin of SFR Yugoslavia, dated 1963, was not issued until September 15, 1964. Although initially part of the Federation dinar, which was discontinued in 1965, both pieces continued to circulate under the hard dinar until May 31, 1968.

The two 5 dinar pieces, which mostly differ from the legend on the obverse, are composed of a 99-percent aluminum alloy and measure 1.67 grams in mass, 24.6 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. They have medallic alignment and a plain edge, and are round in shape. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

Displayed in the center of the obverse is the emblem of FPR and SFR Yugoslavia – which consists of five (FPR) or six (SFR) lit torches surrounded by ears of wheat. A ribbon bearing the date "29·XI·1943" bounds the wheat, and a red star symbolizing communism appears above the entire emblem. On coins minted in 1953, this illustration is surrounded by the Serbo-Croatian name of FPR Yugoslavia in Cyrillic, "ФЕДЕРАТИВНА НАРОДНА РЕПУБЛИКА ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" (Romanized: Federativna Narodna Republika Jugoslavija), which extends clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims. The 1963 piece instead includes the Serbo-Croatian name of SFR Yugoslavia, "СОЦИЈАЛИСТИЧКА ФЕДЕРАТИВНА РЕПУБЛИКА ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" (Romanized: Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija), which curves in the same direction along the outer boundary. The beginning and end of these inscriptions are separated by a group of four diamonds at the bottom of the obverse.

The face value "5 DINARA" is displayed in a decorative font in the middle of the reverse. The numeral in the value is written horizontally in large print in the center, while the word "DINARA" is inscribed counterclockwise along the lower rim in noticeably smaller print. Engraved in the middle of the coin is the Gregorian date of minting, its first two digits divided from the last two by the number "5". Seven five-pointed stars occupy the remainder of the piece's rim at the top of the reverse.

A total of 71,685,000 examples of the 1953 coin and 32,007,000 specimens of the 1963 piece were reportedly produced. Both types were only struck with a standard finish, and a handful of uncirculated examples of each were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Trial strikes and errorsEdit

At least two trial strikes of the 1955 coin are known to exist, including a brass piece and a nickel off-metal strike weighing 5.58 grams.

A 1955 error coin with a 1-millimeter copper line on the obverse is also reported. It weighs a slightly heavier 1.73 grams in mass.

Coins of the hard dinar (1970–1986)Edit

FAO circulation coin (1970)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1970 FAO

1970 FAO commemorative coin

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), an agency of the United Nations tasked with combating world hunger, was formed on October 16, 1945, at a conference in Quebec City, Canada. Since its inception, the FAO has provided assistance to various countries worldwide, including Yugoslavia. In promotion and celebration of the intergovernmental organization, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of circulating commemoratives in denominations of 2 and 5 dinara in 1970 and 1 and 10 dinara in 1976. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian sculptor Dragomir Mileusnić (1943–). Although dated 1970, the 5 dinar piece of the series was not released until March 5, 1971. It remained in circulation until its demonetization on September 30, 1988.

The 5 dinar coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 6.75 grams in mass, 27.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims of its obverse and reverse are raised, and that of the former is decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the center of the obverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", which is abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian and Macedonian name of SFR Yugoslavia, "Социјалистичка Федеративна Република Југославија". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", which is shortened for the Serbo-Croatian Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija and Slovene Socialistična federativna republika Jugoslavija, is engraved in the opposite direction along the coin's lower boundary. These two inscriptions are separated from one another by two groups of four diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large "5" is displayed in the middle of the reverse, inside a circle consisting of four local translations of dinara and the Gregorian date of minting, "1970". The translations are written in the order of the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and revolve clockwise around the "5". They are separated from one another and the date, which is inscribed in the opposite direction below the "5", by small circular points. Ears of wheat are engraved at the left and right peripheries of the reverse, and the caption "FAO" is inscribed counterclockwise at the lower rim. Traveling in the opposite direction at the piece's upper boundary is the motto of the FAO, "FIAT PANIS", which is Latin for "let there be bread".

During a single year of production, 500,000 examples of the commemorative 5 dinar piece were produced. Of these, an unspecified amount of uncirculated coins were sold in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia, and over 3,000 were distributed in promotional albums and boards by the FAO.

First standard circulation coin (1971–1981)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1975

1975 coin

During the 1950s and 1960s, rising inflation caused the purchasing power of the Federation dinar to continue to fall. In response to this problem, in 1966 the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued Yugoslavia's currency at a rate of 100 to 1, creating what became known as the Yugoslav hard dinar. The first series of coins for the new currency, consisting of denominations of 5, 10, 20, and 50 para, and 1 dinar, was minted late that year into the next, but was not fully released until 1967. This series would later be supplemented by new 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinar coins during the 1970s. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins and designed by Serbian sculptor Dragomir Mileusnić. The 5 dinar coin of the series was struck annually from 1971 to 1981, and was first released on March 5, 1971, the same date as the commemorative FAO circulation piece. It remained in circulation until its demonetization on September 30, 1988.

The 5 dinar piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 6.75 grams in mass, 27.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised, and that of the obverse is decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the middle of the obverse, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" engraved clockwise along the rim above and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", printed in the opposite direction at the periphery below. These two inscriptions are separated from one another by two groups of four diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

Like the commemorative FAO coin, the standard circulation piece features a large numeral "5" in the center of its reverse. Its is engraved inside a circle formed by four local translations of dinara – in order the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) – and the Gregorian date of minting. These translations travel clockwise around the numeral and are separated from one another and the date, which is written in the opposite direction below the "5", by small circular points. On some coins minted in 1972, the curve in the "2" is more noticeable than on other pieces of the same year; no other years exhibit any such disparity. A wreath consisting of tied olive and oak branches is engraved along much of the coin's rim, the olive branch occupying the left side of the piece and the oak branch spanning the right. On coins dated 1971, the length of the acorn stalks in the oak branch reportedly vary. Six five-pointed stars representing the constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia also appear on the reverse, occupying the remainder of the coin's rim at the top of the piece.

Mintage figures for the circulation coin differ among various catalogs. According to Ranko Mandić's Catalog of Coins of Yugoslavia and Yugoslavian Lands 1700-1994 and related works, over 11 years of production approximately 104,318,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including pieces with standard and proof finishes. In contrast, the Standard Catalog of World Coins indicates a higher mintage of 105,804,383 coins, and does not mention proofs at all. Both, however, report that a small number of uncirculated examples of the 1971–1981 coin were included in official mint sets.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1971 9,742,000 (Mandić)
10,224,000 (SCWC)
1972 27,974,000
1973 12,705,000
1974 6,054,000
1975 12,533,000 (Mandić)
13,533,000 (SCWC)
1975 Proof Unknown (Mandić)
1976 4,961,000 (Mandić)
4,965,383 (SCWC)
1976 Proof Unknown (Mandić)
1977 922,000
1978 1,000,000
1979 3,000,000
1980 9,977,000
1981 15,450,000
Total ~104,318,000 (Mandić)
105,804,383 (SCWC)

Liberation circulation coin (1975)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1975 liberation

1975 liberation commemorative coin

In 1941, not long after Yugoslavia was partitioned by the Axis powers, resistance groups in the country began to fight against the occupying Axis forces. Among these groups was the Partisans, which from 1941 launched a series of attacks against Germany and its allies, and in the process liberated large parts of Yugoslavia. The country was fully liberated during the spring of 1945, shortly after the Axis defeat in Europe.

In celebration of the 30th anniversary of Yugoslavia's liberation in 1975, that year the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of a circulating commemorative 5 dinar piece. The coin was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian sculptor Dragomir Mileusnić. It entered circulation on August 4, 1975, and continued to see use until its demonetization on September 30, 1988.

The piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 6.75 grams in mass, 27.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised, and that of the obverse is decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed in the middle of the obverse, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" inscribed clockwise along the rim above and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", written in the opposite direction at the periphery below. These inscriptions are separated from one another by two groups of four diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "5" is displayed in the center of the reverse, inside a circle consisting of four local renderings of the word dinara and the Gregorian date of minting, "1975". Written in the order of the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), the translations revolve clockwise around the "5", while the date travels in the opposite direction below the number. The four renderings are separated from one another and the date by small circular points. Another ring of text encircles that one, consisting of the Serbo-Croatian inscriptions "30 GOD. POBJEDE NAD FAŠIZMOM" and "30 ГОД. ПОБЕДЕ НАД ФАШИЗМОМ" (Romanized: 30 god. pobede nad fašizmom). The "GOD." and "ГОД." in these inscriptions are abbreviated for the word godina, which is rendered in Cyrillic as "година". The former translation is written in the Ijekavian dialect, which is commonly spoken by the Croats, and travels clockwise above the value. The latter is rendered in Ekavian, which is commonly used by the Serbs, and revolves below the value in the opposite direction. One more ring of text is engraved clockwise along the coin's rim, consisting of the Macedonian "30 ГОД. ОД ПОБЕДАТА НАД ФАШИЗМОТ" (Romanized: 30 god. od pobedata nad fašizmot), the "ГОД." abbreviated for "години" (godini), and the Slovene "30 LET ZMAGE NAD FAŠIZMOM". These legends are respectively printed at the piece's left and right peripheries. Translating literally as "30 years of victory over fascism", the four inscriptions mark the anniversary of the end of World War II and the complete liberation of Yugoslavia. The Ijekavian and Ekavian and Macedonian and Slovene legends are separated from one another by small circular points. Six five-pointed stars representing the constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia also appear on the reverse, occupying the remainder of the rim at the bottom of the piece.

A total of 1,020,000 business strikes of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production.

1978 pattern coinsEdit

Evidently, plans to redesign Yugoslavia's currency were underway around 1978, as a series of unissued pattern coins in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinara was struck that year at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins. All of the pieces were likely designed by Dragomir Mileusnić, the artist of various Yugoslav coins of the time period.

The 5 dinar piece was struck in a variety of compositions and measurements. Three cupronickel examples are reported, including pieces weighing 6.3, 5.3, and 6.1 grams, which respectively measure 25.7, 24, and 25.8 millimeters in diameter. A nickel piece measuring 7 grams in mass and 25.9 millimeters in diameter is also known. Regardless of variety, the 1978 patterns have medallic alignment and raised, undecorated rims, and are round in shape.

Two obverse varieties of the coin exist. The first, which is only exhibited on the cupronickel piece weighing 6.3 grams, features the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia inside a beaded circular boundary. Printed above, extending from the left to right rims, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is written in the same direction below, traveling from the piece's right to left peripheries. Both inscriptions are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

The second obverse variety, similar in design to the then unissued 1988–1989 Yugoslav coin series, is used on the remaining cupronickel coins and the nickel piece. Engraved in the center is the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia, the Latin "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA" curved clockwise to the left and the Cyrillic "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" arched in the same direction to the right. These legends, separated by two small points, form the outline of a circle inside a raised square border.

The reverse of all pieces, regardless of the obverse variety, is uniform. A large numeral "5" is inscribed in the center, superimposing eight lines of the word dinara in Serbo-Croatian, Slovene, and Macedonian. In order, the words are written as "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", "DINARJEV", and "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and are separated from one another by small circular points. An "M" mark, likely identifying the designer, is additionally included near the end of the last line, and is followed by the Gregorian date of minting, "1978".

The total mintages of the 1978 patterns are currently unknown. They are currently documented in specialized coin catalogs, including Ranko Mandić's Catalog of Coins of Yugoslavia and Yugoslavian Lands 1700-1994 and Zlatko Viščević's Coins and Banknotes of Yugoslavia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Macedonia, but are not referenced in the popular Standard Catalog of World Coins as of its 2017 edition.

Varieties
No. Obverse border Composition Mass Diameter References
1 Circular Cupronickel 6.3 g 25.7 mm R153 (Mandić)
S158 (Viščević)
2 Square 5.3 g 24 mm R154 (Mandić)
S159 (Viščević)
3 6.1 g 25.8 mm R155 (Mandić)
S160 (Viščević)
4 Nickel 7 g 25.9 mm S161 (Viščević)

Second standard circulation coin (1982–1986)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1982

1982 coin

Another period of high inflation occurred in Yugoslavia during the early 1980s, causing the purchasing power of the hard dinar to continue to fall. As a result, many of the small denomination coins used at the time began to disappear from circulation. In 1982, the National Bank of Yugoslavia discontinued the lower valued 5, 10, and 20 para coins, and introduced a new series in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinara. Three years later in 1985, these were joined by new 20, 50, and 100 dinar coins. All of the coins of the series were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić. The 5 dinar piece, which was struck annually from 1982 to 1986, was introduced on May 20, 1982, and remained in circulation until September 30, 1988.

The 5 dinar coin is composed of a brass alloy of 75 percent copper, 21 percent zinc, and 4 percent nickel, and measures 5.6 grams in mass, 24 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the center of the obverse, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" inscribed clockwise along the rim above and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below. These inscriptions are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "5" is displayed in the center of the obverse. Four translations of the word dinara – the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) – are printed clockwise in that order from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries, while the Gregorian date of minting is written in the opposite direction at the bottom rim. The translations are separated from each other and the year by small circular points.

Over five consecutive years of production, a reported 245,756,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, an unknown number of uncirculated pieces were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1982 40,956,000
1983 40,156,000
1984 33,023,000
1985 94,422,000
1986 37,199,000
Total 245,756,000
Trial strikes and errorsEdit

Copper trial strikes of the coin bearing the dates 1985 and 1986 are known to exist.

Notable errors include coins struck on the planchets of contemporary 50 para and 1, 2, and 10 dinar pieces. Because these planchets respectively measure 19, 20, 22, and 23 millimeters, compared to the 24 millimeters of a regular 5 dinar piece, parts of their design are typically cut off. Examples using the planchets of the 50 para piece, composed of bronze and weighing 2.8 grams, are reported with the date "1982". Those utilizing 1 dinar flans are made of brass and weigh 3.6 grams, and bear the dates "1982", "1985", and "1986". Coins on 2 dinar planchets are reported with dates of "1985" and "1986", and are composed of brass and measure 4.3 grams in mass, while pieces on 10 dinar flans are only known with the date "1983" and are composed of copper-nickel-zinc and weigh 5.1 grams.

Coins with irregular die axes are also known, including a 1984-dated piece with coin alignment.

Coins of the convertible dinar (1990–1992)Edit

First circulation coin (1990–1992)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1991

1991 coin

Into the late 1980s, high levels of inflation continued to weaken the Yugoslavian economy. Economic problems eventually culminated in late 1989 when a brief period of hyperinflation significantly reduced the purchasing power of the Yugoslav hard dinar. In response to this problem, the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued the nation's currency on January 1, 1990, creating what became known as the Yugoslav convertible dinar. On January 3 of the same year, the country's central bank introduced a new series of coins in denominations of 10, 20, and 50 para, and 1, 2, and 5 dinara. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić. The 5 dinar coin of the series remained in circulation until July 3, 1992, two days after the reformed dinar was introduced. During the short period between July 1 and July 3, the piece had a value equivalent to 0.05 reformed dinar.

The 5 dinar coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 8.63 grams in mass, 28 millimeters in diameter, and 2.2 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The coin's design is very similar to that of the 1982–1986 piece. Featured in the center of the obverse is the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" inscribed clockwise along the rim above and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below. The inscriptions are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

The reverse features a large numeral "5" in its center, with four translations of the word dinara – the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) – printed clockwise in that order from the lower left to lower right rims. They are separated from one another and the date of minting, which is written in the opposite direction at the bottom of the coin, by small circular points.

Over three consecutive years of production, around 137,844,500 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, an unspecified number of uncirculated pieces were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia. Reportedly, a large portion of the 1992 coins were melted down, making them rarer and slightly more valuable than earlier dated examples.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1990 9,354,000
1991 113,420,500
1992 15,070,000
Total 137,844,500
Trial strikes and errorsEdit

A 1990-dated nickel trial strike is known to exist. Although it has the same diameter as the normal piece, it is noticeably thicker and weighs approximately 10.4 grams.

A notable 5 dinar error coin was struck on the copper-nickel-zinc planchet of a contemporary 1 dinar piece. The coin, which weighs around 6 grams, lacks some of its design due to being manufactured on a smaller 24-millimeter flan.

29th Chess Olympiad coin (1990)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1990 Chess Olympiad

1990 Chess Olympiad commemorative coin

The Chess Olympiad, an international chess tournament featuring countries from around the world, has been held since 1927. Originally occurring at irregular intervals, the competition has been held biennially since 1950. Each year the Chess Olympiad is held at a different venue, allowing multiple countries and cities the opportunity to host the tournament. During its existence, Yugoslavia hosted the competition three times. The 9th Chess Olympiad was held in Dubrovnik (now in Croatia), followed by the 20th in Skopje (now in Macedonia), and the 29th in Novi Sad (now in Serbia).

In celebration of the 29th Chess Olympiad in Novi Sad, the National Bank of Yugoslavia issued a series of non-circulating commemorative coins in denominations of 5, 100, 150, and 1,500 dinara on October 16, 1990. They were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 5 dinar piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 8.63 grams in mass, 28 millimeters in diameter, and 2.2 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the middle of the obverse, where it is enclosed within a solid, mostly circular boundary with a horizontal border at the bottom. Printed outside this boundary, extending clockwise along the left rim, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the right periphery, and is separated from the Cyrillic by a small diamond at the top of the obverse. A large numeral "5" is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the coin, flanked to the left by a small Cyrillic "Д" (de) and to the right by a small Latin "D". These are respectively abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV".

Displayed in the middle of the reverse is the logo of the 29th Chess Olympiad – which consists of a rounded diamond containing a rook topped by a dove in its center. In the depiction, the date is displayed at the base of the rook and the dove holds an olive branch symbolizing peace in its beak. The name of the host city, "NOVI SAD", is engraved horizontally to the left of the rook in the illustration, and five linked squares similar to the Olympic rings are featured to the right. Printed clockwise along the piece's upper periphery, above the logo, is the Serbo-Croatian legend "29. ŠAHOVSKA OLIMPIJADA". Its English equivalent, "THE 29th CHESS OLYMPIAD.", is written in the opposite direction at the lower rim, separated from the Serbo-Croatian by two square points, one at each side of the reverse.

Around 20,000 examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production, all with a proof finish.

Coins of the reformed dinar (1992)Edit

Circulation coin (1992)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1992

1992 coin

During the 1990s, a series of political crises began to dramatically affect Yugoslavia. From 1991 to 1992, four of the six constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia broke away from the union, becoming what are now the independent nations of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, and Slovenia. As a result, the remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro united to form the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FR Yugoslavia) in 1992. In addition, unresolved ethnic conflicts in former Yugoslavia escalated into a series of wars during the time period.

Economic problems also continued into the 1990s. The National Bank of Yugoslavia's initiative in revaluing the dinar in 1990 proved unsuccessful, and in April 1992 another period of hyperinflation began. In another effort to combat the weakening of Yugoslavia's currency, the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued the dinar again on July 1, 1992, thereby establishing the Yugoslav reformed dinar. On this date, a new series of coins in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 50 dinara was introduced; they circulated briefly until their eventual demonetization on September 10, 1993. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 5 dinar coin, struck solely in 1992, is composed of a brass alloy of 90 percent copper and 10 percent zinc and measures 5.13 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of the National Bank of Yugoslavia – which consists of a monogram inside a rectangular boundary – is displayed in the middle of the obverse. In the depiction, the letters comprising the monogram, "НБЈ", make up the initials of "Народна банка Југославије" (Romanized: Narodna banka Jugoslavije), the name of the bank in Serbo-Croatian. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", and written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is its Latin equivalent, "JUGOSLAVIJA".

A large, thick numeral "5" occupies the center of the reverse, the Cyrillic "ДИНАРА" inscribed clockwise in small print at the left rim and the Latin "DINARA" written in the same font and direction at the right periphery. Displayed below the "5" in smaller print is the Gregorian date of minting, "1992".

During a single year of production, approximately 26,658,000 examples of the coin were manufactured. Only business strikes of this particular piece are reported to exist.

Coins of the 1993 dinar (1993)Edit

Circulation coin (1993)Edit

Yugoslavia 5 dinara 1993

1993 coin

Shortly after the Yugoslav reformed dinar was introduced in 1992, FR Yugoslavia experienced another period of hyperinflation. In response to this problem, the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued the dinar once more on October 1, 1993, establishing what became known as the 1993 or October dinar. On this date, the central bank issued a series of coins in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinara. A 500 dinar piece was evidently planned, but never released into circulation. On November 30, 1993, only about two months after being introduced, the coins were withdrawn and demonetized due to their limited use. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins.

The 5 dinar coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 4.67 grams in mass, 22 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both sides are raised and form the outline of an octagon, and are decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of the National Bank of Yugoslavia is engraved in the center of the coin's obverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Latin "SR JUGOSLAVIJA", an abbreviation for the Serbo-Croatian Savezna Republika Jugoslavija (English: "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia"). Its Cyrillic equivalent, "СР JУГОСЛАВИJА", which is shortened for "Савезна Република Југославија", is inscribed below the bank emblem, extending in the opposite direction at the coin's bottom periphery.

A large numeral "5" is engraved in the middle of the reverse, the Cyrillic "ДИНАРА" inscribed clockwise along the rim to the left and the Latin "DINARA" engraved in the same direction at the periphery to the right. Written horizontally in smaller print below the number is the Gregorian date of minting, "1993".

During a single year of production, 10,135,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish.

Coins of the novi dinar (2000–2002)Edit

Circulation coin (2000–2002)Edit

See also: Serbian 5 dinar coin
Yugoslavia 5 dinara 2000

2000 coin

Unchecked hyperinflation in Yugoslavia resulted in the demise of the 1993 dinar by the end of 1993, resulting in yet another revaluation attempt by the National Bank of Yugoslavia on January 1, 1994. This currency, commonly referred to as the 1994 or January dinar, was even less successful than its predecessor, having been withdrawn less than a month after its introduction, on January 24. On this date, the National Bank of Yugoslavia released the novi dinar, which unlike previous incarnations of Yugoslavia's currency, was not revalued but pegged at par with the Deutsche Mark. Initially volatile, the new currency began stabilizing around 1999. It was replaced in Montenegro by the Deutsche Mark later that year, and in Serbia by the Serbian dinar in 2003.

In 1994, the National Bank of Yugoslavia issued the first series of coins of the novi dinar, which consisted of denominations of 1, 5, 10, and 50 para and 1 dinar. These were joined in 2000 by new 50 para and 1, 2, and 5 dinar pieces. This series, the last attributed to the nation of Yugoslavia, was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade. The 5 dinar piece, which was manufactured in 2000 and 2002, was initially released on December 15, 2000. It remained in circulation as part of the novi dinar until 2003, and as part of the Serbian dinar from then until January 1, 2010. The coin, along with the others introduced in 2000, was reportedly designed by Serbian sculptor Mitar Petković.

The 5 dinar piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 6.24 grams in mass, 24 millimeters in diameter, and 2 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and undecorated.

Featured in a solid circular boundary in the middle of the obverse is the coat of arms of FR Yugoslavia – which consists of an escutcheon bearing a double-headed eagle in its center. A shield superimposes the eagle's breast, containing symbols representative of the Serbs and Montenegrins. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "СР JУГОСЛАВИJА", and written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is its Latin equivalent, "SR JUGOSLAVIJA". These inscriptions are separated from one another by two small circular points, one at each side of the obverse.

The front of Yugoslavia's Federal Assembly building, now the House of the National Assembly of Serbia, is displayed on the reverse. A large numeral "5" is inscribed at the left side of the piece, partially superimposing the building, and the words "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA" are printed clockwise at the upper rim, separated from one another by a single circular point. The Gregorian date of minting, "2000" or "2002", superimposes the Federal Assembly building below the "5", and is shown in a noticeably smaller font.

During two years of production, approximately 68,728,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. An unspecified amount of uncirculated specimens were sold in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
2000 37,762,500
2002 30,966,000
Total 68,728,500

ReferencesEdit

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Yugoslav dinar
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Miscellaneous DinarHyperinflationInstitute for Manufacturing Banknotes and CoinsLanguages and currencyNational Bank of YugoslaviaParaYugoslav leaders on currencyYugoslav mint setsYugoslav proof sets

Template:Serbian dinar

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