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Yugoslav 10 dinar coin

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This article is about the Yugoslav coin struck in various types from 1931 to 1993. For Serbian coins of the same denomination, see Serbian 10 dinar coin (disambiguation). For Macedonian coins of a similar denomination, see Macedonian 10 denar coin.
10 dinara
Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1993
1993 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR/FPR Yugoslavia
Flag of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Kingdom of Yugoslavia

Used by
Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia (1992–1993)
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR/FPR Yugoslavia (1957–1989)
Flag of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1932–1941)
Flag of German Reich (1935–1945) German occupied Serbia (1942)
Value

10.00 dinara

Years

19311993

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 7 g (1931)
  • 5 g (1938)
  • 3 g (1955-1963)
  • 10 g (1976-1981)
  • 5.1 g (1982-1988)
  • 8.7 g (1983 commemoratives)
  • 2.5 g (1988-1989)
  • 6.5 g (1992)
  • 5.95 g (1993)
Diameter
  • 25 mm (1931)
  • 23 mm (1938)
  • 21 mm (1955-1963)
  • 30 mm (1976-1981, 1983 commemoratives)
  • 23 mm (1982-1988)
  • 17 mm (1988-1989)
  • 25 mm (1992)
  • 24 mm (1993)
Thickness
  • 1.5 mm (1938)
  • 1.05 mm (1955-1963)
  • 2 mm (1976-1981)
  • 1.75 mm (1982-1988)
  • 1.45 mm (1988-1989)
  • 1.8 mm (1992)
  • 1.7 mm (1993)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment
Edge
  • reeded (1931-1988, 1992)
  • plain (1988-1989, 1993)
Obverse

See text

Reverse

See text

v · d · e

The 10 dinar coin is a circulation and commemorative piece of Yugoslavia, a former Southeast European country that existed during the 20th and early 21st centuries. It was produced in 12 major types from 1931 to 1993: two under the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, one under the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia), seven under the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFR Yugoslavia), and two under the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FR Yugoslavia; later known as Serbia and Montenegro).

The first coin, a circulation piece of King Alexander I (1888–1934; r. 1921–1934), was produced in 1931 and first issued during the summer of 1932. Another monarchical issue dated 1938 was then released in 1940 under Alexander's successor, Peter II (1923–1970; r. 1934–1945), and his regent, Prince Paul Karađorđević (1893–1976). Both of these pieces initially carried a legal tender face value equivalent to 10.00 Yugoslav Serbian dinara. By the time Yugoslavia was invaded by Axis powers during the spring of 1941, the coin of Alexander had already been withdrawn from circulation. The 10 dinar piece of Peter, however, continued to see use in the Serbian region of occupied Yugoslavia until 1942, holding a value of 10.00 Serbian dinara, or 125 of a Reichsmark.

During the existence of the proclaimed Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (DF Yugoslavia) from 1943 to 1945, no new coins of the denomination were introduced. The next 10 dinar piece (dated 1955) would not be released until 1957, during the existence of the short-lived Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia. It was then followed in 1964 by the first piece of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (dated 1963). Both pieces initially carried a face value of 20.00 Federation dinara. Although this currency was replaced in 1966 by the hard dinar, the two coins continued to be valid for 0.10 hard dinara until their demonetization in 1985.

Six coins of the denomination were then introduced under the new Yugoslav currency, each holding a value of 10.00 hard dinara. The first was introduced in 1976 and remained in production until 1981. A 1976-dated circulating commemorative celebrating the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) was then also released in 1977 alongside this initial issue. Both pieces were then followed in 1982 by a new circulation variety, which continued to be struck until its discontinuation in 1988. Circulating commemoratives marking the anniversary of the Battles of the Neretva and Sutjeska in World War II (1939–1945) were also issued during late 1983, and a final circulation type of the hard dinar was then released in 1988 and produced into 1989. These six pieces were eventually demonetized in late 1989 before the introduction of the Yugoslav convertible dinar in 1990.

No 10 dinar coins were issued for the convertible dinar, but one was made under its successor, the reformed dinar. Introduced during the summer of 1992, the piece circulated very briefly before being demonetized near the end of 1993.

A final 10 dinar piece was introduced in 1993 as part of the "1993" dinar. It held a legal tender face value of 10.00 "1993" dinara for about two months before being demonetized later that year.

All of the coins were distributed by the National Bank of Yugoslavia (now the National Bank of Serbia) and its precursor, the National Bank of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The 1931 type was struck jointly at the Royal Mint at Tower Hill, London, and the Monnaie de Paris in France. All later examples were produced at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins (Serbo-Croatian: Zavod za izradu novčanica i kovanog novca) in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (in modern Serbia).

CoinsEdit

Coins of the Serbian dinar (1931–1938)Edit

1925 pattern coinEdit

It has been requested that this section be expanded. Please improve it in any way you seem necessary, and remove this notice once the section is more complete.

The Standard Catalog of World Coins contains a listing for a gold 10 dinar pattern coin dated 1925. According to the popular coin catalog, only 4 examples were made.

Coin of Alexander I (1931)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1931

1931 coin

On December 1, 1918, nearly a month after the conclusion of World War I (1914–1918), the Kingdom of Serbia was unified with Montenegro and the State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (colloquially known as "Yugoslavia"). Peter I Karađorđević (1844–1921; r. 1918–1921), the previous Serbian monarch, was declared as king of the newly formed nation, and his dynasty, the House of Karađorđević, was established as the country's royal family.

After Peter's death in 1921, his second son, Alexander Karađorđević, became the next King of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Upon ascending the throne, he adopted the royal name "Alexander I" (Serbo-Croatian: Aleksandar I). In 1929, in response to growing separatism in Yugoslavia, Alexander unpopularly abolished the country's first constitution, prorogued the Yugoslav Parliament, and introduced a personal dictatorship. He also officially renamed the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and redefined the nation's internal divisions. From then, he ruled absolutely until his assassination in 1934.

Between 1931 and 1932, the National Bank of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia authorized the production of new coins in denominations of 10, 20, and 50 dinara. These were intended to circulate alongside the 5, 10, 25, and 50 para, and 1 and 2 dinar pieces already in circulation. The 10 dinar coin, although dated 1931, was not released until July 18, 1932, and continued to see use until its demonetization on August 31, 1940. The piece was struck under commission at the Monnaie de Paris and the Royal Mint, and was designed by English sculptor Percy Metcalfe (1895–1970).

The 10 dinar coin, struck solely in 1931, is composed of a .500 fine silver alloy of 50 percent silver, 40 percent copper, 5 percent nickel, and 5 percent zinc. It measures 7 grams in mass and 25 millimeters in diameter, and has coin alignment and a reeded edge. The piece, like most coins, is round in shape, and both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

A left-facing bust of King Alexander I appears in the middle of the obverse. The Serbo-Croatian caption "ALEKSANDAR I. KRALJ JUGOSLAVIJE", which translates as "Alexander I, King of Yugoslavia", partially surrounds the monarch's likeness, traveling clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right boundaries.

Featured in the center of the reverse is the coat of arms of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia – which consists of a double-headed eagle surmounted by the Karađorđević dynastic crown. In the arms, a shield containing symbols representative of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes also superimposes the eagle's breast. The Gregorian date of minting, "1931", is engraved horizontally in the middle of the piece, the first two digits (19) separated from the last two (31) by the coat of arms. Printed counterclockwise in Latin script at the bottom of the piece is the face value "10 DINARA". On examples struck in France, a cornucopia mark identifying the mint is displayed to the left of the value, and the wing mark of Lucien Georges Bazor (1889–1974), the Graveur général des monnaies (General Engraver of Coins) of Paris at the time, is engraved to the right.

During a single year of production, around 23,000,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including a large number of business strikes and a small quantity of proofs. Of these, an estimated 19,000,000 pieces were struck at the Royal Mint, and around 4,000,000 coins were struck at the Monnaie de Paris. Because pieces made in Paris are rarer than examples minted in London, they tend to sell at slightly higher prices.

Coin of Peter II (1938)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1938

1938 coin

After Alexander's assassination in 1934, his oldest son, Peter II (Serbo-Croatian: Petar II), was declared the next King of Yugoslavia. However, being only 11 years old at the start of his reign, Peter was considered too young to assume the monarchical responsibilities of the kingdom, and Prince Paul Karađorđević, a first cousin of Alexander, was appointed to govern in the young king's place as regent until he came of age.

On March 25, 1941, despite opposition from Peter and his advisers, Prime Minister Dragiša Cvetković (1893–1969; i.o. 1939–1941) signed the Tripartite Pact, thereby aligning Yugoslavia with the Axis powers. In response, two days later opposition forces supported by the United Kingdom launched a successful coup d'état against the government of Cvetković and Prince Paul. This initiative allowed the 17-year-old Peter to finally seize monarchical power, but ultimately led to the Axis invasion and subsequent occupation of Yugoslavia later that year.

In 1938, during the regency of Prince Paul, the National Bank of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia authorized the production of a new series of coins in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 10, 20, and 50 dinara. The 10 dinar piece was released on May 31, 1940, and remained in circulation throughout Yugoslavia until the Axis occupation during the spring of 1941. It then continued to be used in areas of German occupied Serbia until March 3, 1942. The coin was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dalmatian sculptor Frano Meneghello Dinčić (1900–1986).

The 10 dinar coin is composed of nickel and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the rims of the piece are raised and undecorated.

A right-facing bust of King Peter II appears in the middle of the obverse. The state title of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in Serbo-Croatian, "КРАЉЕВИНА ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" (Romanized: Kraljevina Jugoslavija), partially encircles the monarch's likeness, extending clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right boundaries. Engraved in small print near Peter's bust truncation is the Cyrillic signature of the author, "Ф·ДИНЧИЋ" (Romanized: F. Dinčić).

The face value "10 DINARA" is written on two lines in the center of the reverse, the numeral engraved in larger print than the following word. Inscribed below "DINARA" in smaller print is the Gregorian date of minting, "1938". A tied wreath consisting of an olive branch at the left and an oak branch at the right occupies much of the coin's rim, while the Karađorđević dynastic crown appears at the top of the piece, above the numeral in the face value.

A total of 25,000,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were struck during a single year of production.

Trial strikesEdit

In addition to the circulation issues, a copper trial strike of the 1938 coin was also produced in small quantities.

Coins of the Federation dinar (1955–1963)Edit

Circulation coins (1955–1963)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1963

1963 coin

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1955

1955 coin

After being fully liberated from Axis control, on November 29, 1945, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia became the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia). This new communist republic was initially led by Marshal Josip Broz Tito (1892–1980), the leader of the anti-Axis Yugoslav Partisans during World War II. He served from 1945 to 1963 as the new government's first prime minister, or head of government, and from 1953 to his death in 1980 as the country's first president, or head of state.

With the ratification of a new constitution on April 7, 1963, the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia was officially renamed the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFR Yugoslavia). As a result of this change, various coins and banknotes bearing the updated name were introduced in 1964. Yugoslavia continued to use the name SFR Yugoslavia until 1992, when the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was established.

Having been discontinued during the Axis occupation of Yugoslavia, the Yugoslav Serbian dinar was replaced in 1944 by the Federation dinar. The second series of coins for this currency, which consisted of denominations of 50 para and 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 dinara, was minted from 1953 to 1955 at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade. Because of Yugoslavia's name change in 1963, similar coins of the same denominations were also produced in 1963 with updated legends. Both series were designed by Frano Meneghello Dinčić. The 10 dinar coin of FPR Yugoslavia, although dated 1955, was not released until April 25, 1957. Similarly, the coin of SFR Yugoslavia, dated 1963, was not issued until September 15, 1964. Although part of the Federation dinar, which was discontinued in 1965, both pieces continued to circulate as part of the Yugoslav hard dinar until December 31, 1985.

The two 10 dinar pieces, which mostly differ from the legend on the obverse, are composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy of 91 percent copper and 9 percent aluminum, and measure 3 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.05 millimeters in thickness. They have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of the obverse and reverse are raised, and that of the former is decorated with a beaded border.

Displayed in the middle of the obverse is the emblem of FPR and SFR Yugoslavia – which consists of five (FPR) or six (SFR) lit torches surrounded by ears of wheat. A ribbon bearing the date "29·XI·1943" bounds the wheat, and a red star symbolizing communism appears above the entire emblem. On coins minted in 1955, this illustration is surrounded by the Serbo-Croatian name of FPR Yugoslavia, "FEDERATIVNA NARODNA REPUBLIKA JUGOSLAVIJA", which travels clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims. The 1963 piece instead includes the Serbo-Croatian name of SFR Yugoslavia, "SOCIJALISTIČKA FEDERATIVNA REPUBLIKA JUGOSLAVIJA", which curves in the same direction along the obverse's outer periphery. The beginning and end of the inscriptions are separated from one another by a group of four diamonds at the bottom of the obverse.

A left-facing Yugoslav countrywoman wearing a headcloth is displayed at the right side of the reverse. In her hand she holds a sheaf of wheat that represents Yugoslavia's agricultural industry. Written horizontally to the upper left of the woman is the face value "10 ДИНАРА" (Romanized: 10 Dinara). The numeral and word in this value are separated onto their own lines, and the former is displayed in a significantly larger font than the latter. On the 1963 coin, the "10" in this value is significantly larger than on the 1955 piece. Inscribed in smaller print below the word "ДИНАРА" (dinara) is the Gregorian date of minting, either "1955" or "1963". The signature of the artist, "DINČIĆ M·F", is engraved in a small font to the lower left of the woman, between her neck and the wheat sheaf. The surname ("DINČIĆ") is featured on its own line, while the first two initials of Dinčić's name ("M·F") are included on a new line below.

A total of 185,106,000 examples of the 1955 coin and 5,656,000 specimens of the 1963 piece were reportedly produced. Because of the large difference in mintage quantities, the latter coin tends to sell at slightly higher prices than the former, but is still relatively inexpensive. Both types were only struck with a standard finish, and a handful of uncirculated examples of each were sold in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Trial strikes and errorsEdit

The earliest known trial strike of the 1955 piece, an aluminum coin measuring 2.3 grams in mass and 27 millimeters in diameter, was evidently minted around 1953. Another off-metal strike in nickel was also made in 1955.

Certain 1955 and 1963 error coins lack the "DINČIĆ M·F" signature on the reverse. As mint-made anomalies, these coins tend to sell at significantly higher prices than their normal counterparts.

Coins of the hard dinar (1976–1989)Edit

First circulation coin (1976–1981)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1980

1980 coin

During the 1950s and 1960s, rising inflation continued to erode the purchasing power of the Federation dinar. In response to this problem, in 1966 the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued Yugoslavia's currency at a rate of 100 to 1, creating what became known as the Yugoslav hard dinar. The first series of coins for the new currency, consisting of denominations of 5, 10, 20, and 50 para, and 1 dinar, was minted late that year and into the next, but was not fully released until 1967. This series would later be supplemented by new 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinar coins during the 1970s. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić (1943–). The 10 dinar coin of the series was first released on June 1, 1976, and remained in circulation until December 31, 1989, before the introduction of the Yugoslav convertible dinar.

The 10 dinar piece, which was struck annually from 1976 to 1981, is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel. It measures 10 grams in mass, 30 millimeters in diameter, and 2 millimeters in thickness. The piece has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both rims are raised, and the obverse's rim is decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the center of the obverse. Printed clockwise at the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", which is abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian and Macedonian name of SFR Yugoslavia, "Социјалистичка Федеративна Република Југославија". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the opposite direction at the coin's lower periphery, and is shortened for the Serbo-Croatian Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija and Slovene Socialistična federativna republika Jugoslavija. These two inscriptions are separated from one another by two groups of four diamonds, one group at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "10" is engraved in the middle of the reverse, inside a circle consisting of four local translations of dinara and the Gregorian date of minting. The translations are written in the order of the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and revolve clockwise around the "10". They are separated from one another and the date of minting, which is printed in the opposite direction below the "10", by small circular points. A wreath consisting of tied olive and oak branches is engraved along much of the coin's rim, the olive branch occupying the left side of the piece and the oak branch spanning the right. On coins dated 1977, the length of the acorn stalks in the oak branch reportedly vary. Six five-pointed stars representing the constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia also appear on the reverse, occupying the remainder of the coin's rim at the top of the piece.

Over six consecutive years of production, approximately 115,302,500 examples of the coin were produced. An unknown number of uncirculated examples were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia. Some sources, including Ranko Mandić's Catalog of Coins of Yugoslavia and Yugoslavian Lands 1700-1994, suggest pieces with standard and proof finishes exist. Others, such as the Standard Catalog of World Coins, only report the existence of standard pieces and do not mention any proofs.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1976 10,549,500
1977 39,645,000
1977 Proof Unknown
1978 29,834,000
1979 4,969,000
1980 10,139,000
1981 20,166,000
Total 115,302,500
Error coinsEdit

A notable 1981 error coin is struck on the copper-nickel-zinc planchet of a contemporary 2 dinar piece. It measures 5 grams in mass, 24.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. Because the error is struck on a slightly smaller planchet, some of the design is cut off on both sides.

FAO circulation coin (1976)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1976 FAO

1976 FAO coin

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), an agency of the United Nations devoted to fighting world hunger, was formed on October 16, 1945, at a conference in Quebec City, Canada. Since its inception, the FAO has provided assistance to various countries around the world, including Yugoslavia. In promotion and celebration of the intergovernmental organization, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of circulating commemoratives in denominations of 2 and 5 dinara in 1970 and 1 and 10 dinara in 1976. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić. The 10 dinar coin of the series was released on February 1, 1977, and remained in circulation until its demonetization on December 31, 1989.

The 10 dinar piece, struck solely in 1976, is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel. It measures 10 grams in mass, 30 millimeters in diameter, and 2 millimeters in thickness. The coin has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised, and that of the former is decorated with a beaded border.

The coin's obverse is identical to that of the 1976–1981 circulation coin. The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the center, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" written clockwise above the symbol and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", printed in the opposite direction below. These two inscriptions are separated from one another by two groups of four diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

Like the circulating 10 dinar piece introduced in 1976, a large numeral "10" is engraved in the middle of the reverse, inside a circle consisting of four local translations of the word dinara and the Gregorian date of minting, "1976". The translations, which are written in the order of the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), revolve clockwise around the "10". They are separated from one another and the date, which is printed in the opposite direction below the numeral, by small circular points. Ears of wheat are engraved at the piece's left and right peripheries, and the caption "FAO" is inscribed counterclockwise at the bottom of the coin, near the rim. Written in the opposite direction at the piece's upper boundary is the FAO's motto, "FIAT PANIS", Latin for "let there be bread".

During a single year of production, 500,000 examples of the commemorative 10 dinar coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, an unknown number of uncirculated examples were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia, and more than 3,000 were sold in promotional albums and boards by the FAO.

1978 pattern coinEdit

Evidently, planning for a new series of Yugoslav coins took place around 1978, as a series of unissued pattern coins in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinara was struck that year at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins. All of the pieces were likely designed by Serbian sculptor Dragomir Mileusnić, the artist of various Yugoslav coins of the time period.

The 10 dinar coin of the series is composed of a cupronickel alloy and measures 8 grams in mass and 28 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and raised, undecorated rims, and is round in shape. The piece's edge bears the inscription "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA ★★★ JUGOSLA★VI★A".

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears inside a dotted circular boundary in the middle of the obverse. Printed above, extending clockwise from the coin's left to right peripheries, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is written in the same direction below the emblem, traveling from the right to left rims. Both inscriptions are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "10" is engraved in the center of the reverse, superimposing eight lines of the word dinara in Serbo-Croatian, Slovene, and Macedonian. In order, the words are written as "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", "DINARJEV", and "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and are separated from one another by small circular points. An "M", likely identifying the designer, is additionally included at the end of the fifth line, and the Gregorian date of minting, "1978", is displayed at the end of the eighth.

According to the Standard Catalog of World Coins, only 15 examples of the coin exist. The Catalog of Coins of Yugoslavia and Yugoslavian Lands 1700-1994 and most derived works do not provide any mintage figures for this particular piece.

Third circulation coin (1982–1988)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1988

1988 coin

Another period of high inflation in Yugoslavia occurred during the early 1980s, causing the purchasing power of the hard dinar to continue to fall. As a result, many of the small denomination coins in circulation at the time began to disappear from circulation. In 1982, the National Bank of Yugoslavia discontinued the lower valued 5, 10, and 20 para coins and introduced a new series of pieces in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinara. Three years later in 1985, these were also joined by new 20, 50, and 100 dinar coins. By then the 25 and 50 para pieces had become virtually obsolete, and by 1986 production of the 1, 2, and 5 dinar coins had ceased. All of the coins of the series were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić. The 10 dinar piece, which was produced annually from 1982 to 1988, was introduced on May 20, 1982, and remained in circulation until September 30, 1988.

The coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 21 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel, and measures 5.1 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.75 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed in the middle of the obverse. Engraved clockwise at the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", and written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA". The two inscriptions are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "10" is featured in the center of the reverse. Four translations of the word dinara – the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) – are printed clockwise in that order from the coin's lower left to lower right boundaries. They are accompanied by the Gregorian date of minting, which is written in the opposite direction at the lower rim. The translations of the word dinara are separated from one another and the date by small circular points.

Over seven consecutive years, approximately 287,150,000 examples of the coin were produced, all with a standard finish. Of these, an unknown number were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1982 8,862,000
1983 42,400,000
1984 30,900,000
1985 31,647,000
1986 40,739,000
1987 104,988,000
1988 27,614,000
Total 287,150,000
Trial strikes and errorsEdit

A brass trial strike of the coin bearing the date 1985 is known to exist.

A notable 1983 error is struck on the brass planchet of a contemporary 1 dinar piece. It measures 3.6 grams in mass, 20 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. Because the error is struck on a smaller planchet, some of the design is cut off on both sides.

Battle of the Neretva circulation coin (1983)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1983 Neretva

1983 Battle of the Neretva coin

The Battle of the Neretva, also known as Case White, was a major Axis offensive launched against the Yugoslav Partisans in early 1943. Having taken place on the Neretva in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina, the operation was initiated with the intent of eliminating Partisan formations and capturing members of the Partisan leadership. After a few months of fighting, the Axis powers managed to secure a tactical victory by inflicting more casualties, but were unable to achieve their objective.

During 1983, the 40th anniversary of the Battle of the Neretva, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of a 10 dinar coin commemorating the event. The piece was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by artists Dragiša Andrić (1942–) and Dragomir Mileusnić. It was released on December 22, 1983, and remained in circulation until December 31, 1989.

The coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel and measures 8.7 grams in mass and 30 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed in the center of the obverse, inside a solid, mostly circular boundary with a horizontal border at the bottom. Printed outside this boundary, extending clockwise along the piece's left rim, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the right periphery, and is separated from the Cyrillic text by a small diamond at the top of the obverse. A large numeral "10" indicating the coin's face value is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the piece, flanked to the left by a small Cyrillic "Д" (de) and to the right by a small Latin "D". These are respectively abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV".

There is a vertical incuse strip in the middle of the reverse, between two raised areas at the left and right sides of the coin. A destroyed bridge on the Neretva near Jablanica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, is displayed in the center of the piece, extending across the raised and incuse sections of the reverse. This structure was destroyed twice during World War II – first by the Partisans and then by the German Luftwaffe – and once more after the war during the production of the 1969 film Battle of Neretva. It was never rebuilt after the movie's release, but still remains a popular tourist attraction to visitors of Jablanica. On the coin, the years "1943" and "1983", respectively representing the dates of the battle and its anniversary, are printed on two lines in the incuse strip above the illustration. They are accompanied by the Latin inscription "NERETVA" and its Cyrillic equivalent, "НЕРЕТВА", which are written on separate lines below the depiction of the bridge.

A total of 1,000,000 examples of the coin were produced, including 900,000 pieces with a standard finish and 100,000 proofs. Of these, an undisclosed number of coins were distributed in official mint and proof sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Battle of the Sutjeska circulation coin (1983)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1983 Sutjeska

1983 Battle of the Sutjeska coin

The Battle of the Sutjeska, also known as Case Black, was a joint Axis attack against the Yugoslav Partisans during the spring of 1943. It took place on the Sutjeska in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina, and immediately followed the Battle of the Neretva. Although the Axis powers managed to secure a tactical victory, they failed in their objective to eliminate Partisan formations and capture members of the Partisan leadership.

In 1983, the 40th anniversary of the Battle of Sutjeska, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of a 10 dinar coin celebrating the event. The piece was struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by artists Dragiša Andrić and Dragomir Mileusnić. It was released on December 22, 1983, and remained in circulation until December 31, 1989.

The coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel, and measures 8.7 grams in mass and 30 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed in the center of the obverse, inside a solid, mostly circular boundary with a horizontal border at the bottom. The Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" is printed outside the boundary, extending clockwise along the coin's left rim. Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the piece's right periphery, and is separated from the Cyrillic by a small diamond at the top of the obverse. A large numeral "10" indicating the coin's face value is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the piece, flanked to the left by a Cyrillic "Д" (de) and to the right by a Latin "D".

The well-known "Battle of Sutjeska" monument in the Valley of Heroes near Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina, is displayed in the middle of the coin's reverse. Carved by Serbian sculptor Miodrag Živković (1928–), the monument was erected in 1971 in honor of the thousands of Partisans killed in the Battle of Sutjeska. The walking path between the two parts of the monument appears on most coins, but is absent on a handful of examples. Printed horizontally on separate lines above are the the years "1943" and "1983", which respectively represent the dates of the battle and its anniversary. They are accompanied by the Latin inscription "SUTJESKA" and its Cyrillic equivalent, "СУТЈЕСКА", which are inscribed on separate lines below the illustration of the monument.

A total of 1,000,000 examples of the coin were produced, including 900,000 pieces with a standard finish and 100,00 proofs. Of these, an undisclosed number of coins were sold in official mint and proof sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Sixth circulation coin (1988–1989)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1989

1989 coin

Because of continuously rising inflation, all Yugoslav coins valued between 25 para and 5 dinara had been withdrawn and demonetized by the end of 1988, leaving only 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinar pieces in circulation. On November 15 of the same year, the National Bank of Yugoslavia released a new series of coins in those denominations to supplement the pieces already in circulation. They were used very briefly before being demonetized on December 31, 1989, before the introduction of the Yugoslav convertible dinar the next day. All of the four coins were minted at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 10 dinar piece, which was struck from 1988 to 1989, is composed of a brass alloy of 75 percent copper, 21 percent zinc, and 4 percent nickel. It measures 2.5 grams in mass, 17 millimeters in diameter, and 1.45 millimeters in thickness, and has medallic alignment and a plain edge. The coin is round in shape and both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the center of the obverse, the Cyrillic "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" curved clockwise above the national symbol and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", arched in the opposite direction below. These inscriptions, separated from one another by two small diamonds, form the outline of a circle inside a raised square field. Written in smaller print below the field is the Gregorian date of minting, "1988" or "1989".

A large incuse "10" is engraved in a raised square area in the middle of the reverse. Written at each side of this square is a local translation of the word dinara. The Serbo-Croatian translation is displayed at the top of the square in Latin as "DINARA", and at the bottom in Cyrillic as "ДИНАРА". At the left side, the Slovene "DINARJEV" is printed vertically upward, and at the right the Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) is inscribed vertically downward.

Over two consecutive years of production, a total of 110,992,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, a small number of uncirculated pieces were sold in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1988 35,992,000
1989 75,000,000
Total 110,992,000
Trial strikes and errorsEdit

At least four types of trial strikes of the 1988–1989 are known to exist. Two brass off-metal strikes were made in 1988, one with a mass of 1.95 grams and diameter of 15 millimeters, and another with a mass of 2.5 grams and diameter of 17 millimeters. Trial strikes in brass-plated and copper-plated zinc were later manufactured in 1989, the former weighing approximately 2.4 grams.

A 1988 error coin using coin alignment instead of medallic alignment is also reported to exist.

Coins of the reformed dinar (1992)Edit

Circulation coin (1992)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1992

1992 coin

During the 1990s, Yugoslavia was affected by a number of political crises. From 1991 to 1992, four of the six constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia broke away from the South Slavic country, becoming what are now the independent nations of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, and Slovenia. As a result, the remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro united to form the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1992. In addition, unresolved ethnic conflicts in former Yugoslavia escalated into a series of wars during the time period.

Economic problems also beset Yugoslavia into the 1990s. Hyperinflation of the hard dinar in 1989 caused the National Bank of Yugoslavia to revalue the nation's currency on January 1, 1990, creating what became known as the Yugoslav convertible dinar. In spite of this initiative, the Yugoslav economy continued to suffer, and another period of hyperinflation began in April 1992. In another effort to combat the weakening of Yugoslavia's currency, the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued the dinar again on July 1, 1992, thereby establishing the Yugoslav reformed dinar. On this date, a new series of coins in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 50 dinara was released; however, these pieces had become virtually obsolete by September 10, 1993, and were consequently demonetized. All five were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins and designed by Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 10 dinar piece, struck solely in 1992, is composed of a brass alloy of 75 percent copper, 21 percent zinc, and 4 percent nickel. It measures 6.5 grams in mass, 25 millimeters in diameter, and 1.8 millimeters in thickness, and has medallic alignment and a reeded edge. The coin is round in shape and both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of the the National Bank of Yugoslavia – which consists of a monogram inside a rectangular boundary – is displayed in the middle of the obverse. The monogram in the emblem consists of the Cyrillic letters "НБЈ", which make up the initials of "Народна банка Југославије" (Romanized: Narodna banka Jugoslavije), the name of the bank in Serbo-Croatian. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Cyrillic legend "ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", and written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is its Latin equivalent, "JUGOSLAVIJA".

A large, thick numeral "10" is engraved in the middle of the reverse, the Cyrillic "ДИНАРА" inscribed above in a smaller horizontal print and the Latin "DINARA" written below in the same font. Displayed horizontally below the "DINARA" in even smaller print is the Gregorian date of minting, "1992".

During a single year of production, approximately 76,607,000 examples of the coin were manufactured. All of these were minted as business strikes.

Coins of the 1993 dinar (1993)Edit

Circulation coin (1993)Edit

Yugoslavia 10 dinara 1993 img2

1993 coin

Shortly after the Yugoslav reformed dinar was introduced in 1992, FR Yugoslavia experienced another period of hyperinflation. In response to this problem, the National Bank of Yugoslavia revalued the dinar once more on October 1, 1993, establishing what became known as the 1993 or October dinar. On this date, the Yugoslav central bank issued a new series of coins in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinara. A 500 dinar piece was evidently planned as well, but was never released for circulation. On November 31, 1993, only about two months after being introduced, the coins were withdrawn and demonetized due to their limited use. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins.

The 10 dinar coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 70 percent copper, 18 percent zinc, and 12 percent nickel, and measures 5.95 grams in mass, 24 millimeters in diameter, and 1.7 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both sides are raised and form the outline of an octagon, and are decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of the National Bank of Yugoslavia is engraved in the center of the coin's obverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Latin "SR JUGOSLAVIJA", an abbreviated form of the Serbo-Croatian Savezna Republika Jugoslavija (English: "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia"). Its Cyrillic equivalent, "СР JУГОСЛАВИJА", which is shortened for "Савезна Република Југославија" is inscribed below the illustration of the bank emblem, extending in the opposite direction along the coin's lower periphery.

A large numeral "10" is engraved in the middle of the reverse, the Cyrillic "ДИНАРА" inscribed above in smaller horizontal print and the Latin "DINARA" written below in the same font. Written below the latter in even smaller print is the Gregorian date of minting, "1993".

During a single year of production, 20,461,000 examples of the coin were produced, all with a standard finish.

ReferencesEdit

 v · d · e
Yugoslav dinar
Banknotes ¼ D½ D1 D2 D5 D10 D20 D25 D50 D100 D200 D500 D1,000 D5,000 D10,000 D20,000 D50,000 D100,000 D500,000 D1,000,000 D2,000,000 D5,000,000 D10,000,000 D50,000,000 D100,000,000 D500,000,000 D1,000,000,000 D5,000,000,000 D10,000,000,000 D50,000,000,000 D500,000,000,000 D
Coins 1 p5 p10 p20 p25 p50 p1 D2 D5 D10 D20 D50 D100 D150 D200 D250 D300 D350 D400 D500 D600 D1,000 D1,500 D2,000 D2,500 D3,000 D5,000 D6,000 D10,000 D20,000 D40,000 D50,000 D100,000 D2,000,000 D

1 Dk4 Dk8 Dk12 Dk

Miscellaneous DinarHyperinflationInstitute for Manufacturing Banknotes and CoinsLanguages and currencyNational Bank of YugoslaviaParaYugoslav leaders on currencyYugoslav mint setsYugoslav proof sets

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