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Yugoslav 100 dinar coin

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This article is about the Yugoslav coin minted from 1968 to 1993. For Macedonian coins of a similar denomination, see Macedonian 100 denar coin.
100 dinara
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1993 im1
1993 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR Yugoslavia

Used by

Flag of Serbia and Montenegro FR Yugoslavia (1993)
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia SFR Yugoslavia (1968–1990)

Years

19681993

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 7.82 g (1968)
  • 10 g (1978)
  • 13 g (1982-1984, 1990)
  • 8.7 g (1985-1988)
  • 5.5 g (1988-1989)
  • 5.1 g (1993)
Diameter
  • 22 mm (1968)
  • 28 mm (1978)
  • 30 mm (1982-1984, 1990)
  • 29 mm (1985-1988)
  • 24.1 mm (1988-1989)
  • 23 mm (1993)
Thickness
  • 1.9 mm (1985-1988)
  • 1.7 mm (1988-1989)
  • 1.6 mm (1993)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment
Edge
  • reeded (1968-1988, 1990)
  • plain (1988-1989, 1993)
Obverse

See text

Reverse

See text

v · d · e

The 100 dinar coin is a circulation and commemorative piece of Yugoslavia, a former Southeast European country that existed during the 20th and early 21st centuries. It was produced in 13 types from 1968 to 1993: 12 under the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and one under its successor, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (later known as Serbia and Montenegro).

The first piece, a non-circulating commemorative dated 1968, was issued in 1969 in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the second session of the Anti-Fascist Council for the National Liberation of Yugoslavia (AVNOJ) in 1943. It was then followed in 1979 by a coin celebrating the 1979 Mediterranean Games in Split, and from 1982 to 1984 by five pieces commemorating the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo. The first circulating 100 dinar piece was then introduced in 1985, and remained in production until its discontinuation in 1988. During this interval, an additional two non-circulating commemoratives were produced, one in late 1987 (dated 1985) celebrating the 40th anniversary of Yugoslavia's liberation during World War II, and another in 1987 commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Serbian philologist and linguist Vuk Karadžić (1787–1864). A redesigned circulation coin was then issued from late 1988 to 1989. These first 11 pieces, as part of the Yugoslav hard dinar, were withdrawn and demonetized on December 31, 1989, with the introduction of the Yugoslav convertible dinar the next day. A single 100 dinar piece of the new currency was made in 1990 in commemoration of the 29th Chess Olympiad in Novi Sad, and was eventually demonetized in 1992 when the reformed dinar made its appearance. No 100 dinar pieces were made under this new dinar, but one final piece of the denomination was eventually issued under the short-lived 1993 dinar, which was withdrawn at the end of the year.

All of the coins were distributed by the National Bank of Yugoslavia (now the National Bank of Serbia). The first type was struck jointly at the Gori & Zucchi Mint in Arezzo, Italy, and the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins (Serbo-Croatian: Zavod za izradu novčanica i kovanog novca) in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Every piece minted from 1978 to 1984 was manufactured under commission by Zlatara Majdanpek in Majdanpek, Yugoslavia (in modern Serbia), while all later pieces were solely produced in Belgrade.

CoinsEdit

Coins of the hard dinar (1968–1989)Edit

Liberation coin (1968)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1968

1968 commemorative coin

On March 25, 1941, Prime Minister Dragiša Cvetković (1893–1969; i.o. 1939–1941) signed the Tripartite Pact, thereby aligning the Kingdom of Yugoslavia with the Axis powers. Two days afterward, opposition groups overthrew the Yugoslav government in a British supported coup d'état, directly leading to the Axis invasion and subsequent occupation of the country later that year.

During much of the war, the Partisans led by Josip Broz Tito (1892–1980) fought for Yugoslavia's liberation, engaging Axis forces on multiple occasions. To administer territories under their control, the Partisans eventually established the Anti-Fascist Council for the National Liberation of Yugoslavia (AVNOJ) on November 26, 1942. At a session in Jajce on November 29, 1943, the AVNOJ announced, among other resolutions, its intention to rebuild Yugoslavia as Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (DF Yugoslavia). Many of the principles decided upon at this conference were eventually implemented after Yugoslavia's complete liberation in 1945.

In celebration of the 1943 AVNOJ session and the liberation of Yugoslavia, in 1968 the nation's central bank authorized the creation of six non-circulating commemorative coins in denominations of 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 dinara. All of the pieces were struck at the private Gori & Zucchi Mint in Arezzo, Italy, and the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade. The 100 dinar coin of the series was designed by painter Miodrag Petrović (1915–1990) and engraved by sculptors Nebojša Mitrić (1931–1989) and Stanko Jančić (1932–).

The 100 dinar piece, which was issued on June 9, 1969, is composed of .900 fine gold and measures 7.82 grams in mass and 22 millimeters in diameter. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and like most coins, is round in shape. The rims of both sides of the piece are raised and undecorated.

Featured inside a solid circular boundary in the center of the coin's obverse is the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia – which consists of six lit torches surrounded by ears of wheat. A ribbon bearing the date "29·XI·1943" bounds the wheat, and a radiant red star symbolizing communism appears above the entire emblem. A mark consisting of an "NI" surrounded by a wreath is additionally included to the lower right on coins minted in Arezzo. The local name of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed outside the border enclosing the emblem, extending clockwise along the coin's left and right rims in Gaj's Latin alphabet and the Serbian Cyrillic alphabet. The two alphabets are included on the coin because Serbo-Croatian uses both, depending on the language form. For instance, Serbian uses both Cyrillic and Latin, while Croatian only uses Latin; Bosnian and Montenegrin use both alphabets as well, but had yet to be standardized at the time of the coin's introduction. In addition to Serbo-Croatian, Macedonian and Slovene, two other languages once spoken in Yugoslavia, respectively use Cyrillic and Latin. On the piece, the Latin "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", short for the Serbo-Croatian Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija and Slovene Socialistična federativna republika Jugoslavija, is engraved at the left periphery, while the Serbo-Croatian and Macedonian "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", abbreviated for "Социјалистичка Федеративна Република Југославија", is displayed at the right boundary. They are separated from one another by a group of four diamonds at the top of the obverse. Printed in the opposite direction at the coin's lower rim is the numeral "100", flanked to the left by the Latin letter "D" and to the right by the Cyrillic "Д" (de). The first letter is an abbreviation for the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV", whereas the second is a shorthand for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari). The representation of the coin's face value is separated from the state titles by two groups of four diamonds, one group at each side.

An illustration of a group of people holding Yugoslav flags is engraved in the middle of the reverse. Symbolizing Yugoslavia's anti-Axis resistance in World War II, these individuals are shown standing near the Pliva Waterfall near Jajce, with the Jajce Fortress illustrated in the background. The dates "29. XI 1943 - 29. XI 1968.", respectively representing the 1943 AVNOJ session and the 25th anniversary of the event, are written clockwise at the coin's upper rim, while the names of Jajce in Latin and Cyrillic, "JAJCE" and "ЈАЈЦЕ" respectively, are printed in the opposite direction at the lower periphery. The two renderings of "Jajce" are separated from one other by a group of four diamonds, and from the dates by olive branches engraved along the coin's left and right rims.

A total of 9,433 proof examples were manufactured during a single year of production. Of these, an estimated 7,433 were struck by Gori & Zucchi in Arezzo and 2,000 were minted by the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins. An unknown number of examples from both facilities were included in proof sets distributed by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mediterranean Games coin (1978)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1978 MG

1978 commemorative coin

The Mediterranean Games, a multi-sport competition involving countries near the Mediterranean Sea, was first held in Alexandria, Egypt, during the autumn of 1951. Like the Olympic Games, the Mediterranean Games occur quadrennially, and are played at different venues every year. Yugoslavia hosted the international sporting competition for the first (and only) time in 1979, holding every event in the coastal city of Split (in modern Croatia).

In celebration of the 1979 Mediterranean Games, in 1978 the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of 10 non-circulating commemorative coins in denominations of 100; 150; 200; 300; 350; 400; 1,500; 2,000; 2,500; and 5,000 dinara. All of the pieces were struck by Zlatara Majdanpek, a precious metals manufacturer based in Majdanpek. The 100 dinar coin of the series was designed by Serbian artists Dragiša Andrić (1942–) and Dragomir Mileusnić (1943–).

The 100 dinar piece, which was initially issued on August 13, 1979, is composed of .925 fine silver and measures 10 grams in mass and 28 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both sides of the coin are raised and undecorated.

The mascot of the 1979 Mediterranean Games, a Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus) named Adrijana, is displayed in the middle of the coin's obverse. Engraved to the upper right is the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia, the Gregorian date of minting, "1978", written horizontally in small print below. Additionally, two symbols representing the coin's designers are depicted below the year. The first, a small "D" between the legs of a larger "A", identifies Dragiša Andrić, while the second, an "M" enclosed within a square border, represents Dragomir Mileusnić. Printed clockwise along the coin's left periphery is the state title "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA". Its Cyrillic equivalent, "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА", is written in the same direction at the right periphery, and is separated from the Latin legend by a small horizontal line at the top of the obverse. Arched counterclockwise at the coin's bottom rim is a large "100", the Cyrillic Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" printed above the Slovene "DINARJEV" to the left, and the Latin Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" written above the Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) to the right. The numeral and accompanying words in the face value are separated from the state titles by two small circular points.

The reverse depicts a left-facing bust of President Josip Broz Tito wearing a decorated jacket in its center. Printed clockwise from the the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries is the Serbo-Croatian caption "JOSIP BROZ TITO - POKROVITELJ VIII MEDITERANSKIH IGARA", which translates to English as "Josip Broz Tito - Sponsor of the VIII (Eighth) Mediterranean Games". The text "SPLIT 1979" is inscribed in the opposite direction at the bottom of the piece, where it is separated from the aforementioned legend by two small circular points.

A total of 71,000 proof examples of the coin were made during a single year of production. An unknown number of pieces were distributed in proof sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

1984 Winter Olympics coins (1982–1984)Edit

See also: Yugoslav 1984 Winter Olympics coins
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1984 Olympics series

1984 Winter Olympics commemorative coins

The Winter Olympic Games, an international event featuring a variety of winter sports, has been held every four years (excluding 1940 and 1944) since 1924. As with most international sporting competitions, the venue for the Winter Olympics changes each year, allowing multiple countries the opportunity to host. Yugoslavia hosted the competition for the first (and only) time in 1984, holding every event in the city of Sarajevo (in modern Bosnia and Herzegovina).

In celebration of the 1984 Winter Olympics and Sarajevo's selection as the host city, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of three series of commemorative coins in 1982 and 1983 (dated from 1982 to 1984). The first series consists of seven coins in denominations of 100, 250; 500; 1,000; 1,500; and 5,000 dinara. Each of the final two series is comprised of two 100, 250, and 500 dinar coins and a single 5,000 dinar piece. All of the pieces were struck by Zlatara Majdanpek and designed by artists Dragiša Andrić, Đorđe Jovanović, Ljubiša Mančić (1951–), Dragomir Mileusnić, and Nebojša Mitrić.

The 100 dinar coins of the series are composed of .925 fine silver and measure 13 grams in mass and 30 millimeters in diameter. They have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims on both sides of each piece are raised and undecorated.

Aside from the date, which, depending on the type, reads "1982", "1983", or "1984", the obverses of the five Olympic 100 dinar pieces are identical. At the left side of a frosted field in the center, inside a polished area, is the emblem of the 1984 Winter Olympics – which consists of a stylized snowflake resembling Sarajevan embroidery under the Olympic rings. The coat of arms of SFR Yugoslavia is displayed to the right of this illustration in a polished field, and the Gregorian date and a symbol of two crossing hammers are shown in small polished fields above. Printed clockwise along the coin's left rim is the Serbo-Croatian title of SFR Yugoslavia in Cyrillic, which reads "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the coin's right periphery. A large numeral "100" is displayed horizontally in large font at the bottom of the obverse, where it is flanked to the left by a smaller Cyrillic "Д" (de), abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and to the right by a Latin "D", shortened for the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV".

The middle of each reverse illustrates a different sport held at the Winter Olympics. Representing ice hockey, the piece dated 1982 shows two hockey players chasing after a puck. The 1983 coins feature the sports of single skating and bobsledding (UK: bobsleigh), respectively depicting a female ice skater performing a spin and two athletes pushing a bobsled (UK: bobsleigh). The last two pieces represent speed skating and pair skating, and respectively show a male speed skater and male and female figure skaters performing a pair spin. All of these central illustrations are enclosed within a solid circular border. The Serbo-Croatian legend "XIV ZIMSKE OLIMPIJSKE IGRE", which translates as "XIV (14th) Winter Olympic Games", is inscribed outside the border, extending clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right boundaries. Occupying the remainder of the rim, traveling counterclockwise at the bottom of the reverse, is the text "SARAJEVO '84".

A total of 110,000 proof examples of each coin were reportedly produced. An unknown number of pieces were distributed in proof sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Coins
Ice hockey Single skating Bobsledding
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1982 hockey
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1983 skating
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1983 bobsledding
Date on coin 1982 Date on coin 1983 Date on coin 1983
Issue date January 31, 1983 Issue date April 1, 1983 Issue date July 1, 1983
Speed skating Pair skating
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1984 speed skating
Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1984 pair skating
Date on coin 1984 Date on coin 1984
Issue date September 1, 1983 Issue date December 1, 1983

First circulation coin (1985–1988)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1986

1986 coin

During the early 1980s, high levels of inflation greatly reduced the purchasing power of the Yugoslav hard dinar, resulting in the disappearance of many small denomination coins and banknotes from circulation. In response to this problem, in 1982 the National Bank of Yugoslavia issued a series of higher valued coins in denominations of 25 and 50 para, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 dinara. Three years later in 1985, these were joined by new 20, 50, and 100 dinar pieces. By then, the lower valued 25 and 50 para coins had already become virtually obsolete, and by 1986, production of the 1, 2, and 5 dinar coins ceased. All of the coins of the series were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić. The 100 dinar piece was introduced on July 20, 1985, and withdrawn on December 31, 1989, with the release of the convertible dinar.

The 100 dinar piece, which was struck annually until 1988, is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel. It measures 8.7 grams in mass, 29 millimeters in diameter, and 1.9 millimeters in thickness. The coin has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The obverse features the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia in its center, the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" inscribed clockwise along the rim above, and its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below. The two legends are separated from one another by two small diamonds, one at each side of the obverse.

A large numeral "100" appears in the middle of the reverse. Four representations of the word dinara – the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and "DINARA", Slovene "DINARJEV", and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) – are printed clockwise in that order from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries, and the Gregorian date of minting is written in the opposite direction at the lower rim. The words are separated from one another and the date by small circular points.

Over four consecutive years of production, a reported 180,952,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, an unknown number were distributed in official mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1985 18,684,000
1986 17,905,000
1987 94,069,000
1988 50,294,000
Total 180,952,000
Notable errorsEdit

Various irregular die axes of the coin are reported to exist. Also, some examples from 1986 were apparently struck using planchets of contemporary 50 dinar pieces.

Liberation coin (1985)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1985 liberation

1985 commemorative coin

Although small engagements continued until May 15, 1945, in Yugoslavia, the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany on May 8 virtually ended World War II in Europe, marking the so-called "victory over fascism". Also, with the close of the European theater, Yugoslavia was officially liberated from Axis control on May 9, 1945.

In 1985, on the occasion of the "40th anniversary of the liberation of Yugoslavia and the victory over fascism", the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of two commemorative coins in denominations of 100 and 5,000 dinara. Both pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić. They were first distributed on December 22, 1987.

The 100 dinar piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel, and measures 8.7 grams in mass, 29 millimeters in diameter, and 1.9 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the coin's rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the middle of the obverse, enclosed within a solid, mostly circular border with a horizontal border at the bottom. Printed outside this boundary, extending clockwise along the piece's left rim, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the right periphery, separated from the Cyrillic text by a small diamond at the top of the coin. A large numeral "100" indicating the piece's face value is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the coin, flanked by a small Cyrillic "Д" (de) to the left and a small Latin "D" to the right. These are respectively abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV".

A left-facing bust of former President Josip Broz Tito is featured in the center of the reverse, surrounded by a decorative rendition of the flag of SFR Yugoslavia – which consists of a horizontal triband with a red star in the middle. Displayed horizontally below the flag in small print are the dates "1945" and "1985", respectively representing the year of Yugoslavia's liberation and the event's 40th anniversary. Because "1985" is incorporated as part of a design element, the coin is undated. The Serbo-Croatian legend "ČETRDESET GODINA OSLOBOĐENJA JUGOSLAVIJE I POBEDE NAD FAŠIZMOM", which translates as "Fortieth anniversary of the liberation of Yugoslavia and the victory over fascism", is curved clockwise along the majority of the rim, extending from the piece's lower left to lower right boundaries. The beginning and end of the inscription are separated from each other by a small circular point at the bottom of the reverse.

A total of 200,000 proof examples were manufactured during a single year of production. Of these, an unknown quantity were distributed in black hinged boxes with a certificate of authenticity.

Vuk Karadžić coins (1987)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1987 Karadžić v1

Normal 1987 commemorative coin

Vuk Karadžić (also spelled as Vuk Karajich) was a Serbian philologist and linguist known for his contributions to linguistics and literature. Among the various accomplishments made throughout his life, Karadžić is perhaps most notable for his reforms to the Serbian language and Serbian Cyrillic alphabet. He remains a celebrated figure in Europe, having posthumously received various degrees and recognitions from several institutions and organizations.

In 1987, the 200th anniversary of Karadžić's birth, the National Bank of Yugoslavia authorized the production of 100; 3,000; 5,000; and 50,000 dinar coins commemorating the Serbian philologist. They were struck by the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian sculptor Nebojša Mitrić. All four were initially distributed on September 15, 1987.

The 100 dinar piece is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel, and measures 8.7 grams in mass, 29 millimeters in diameter, and 1.9 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of the rims on the normal coins are raised, and that on the reverse is decorated with a beaded border. The obverse usually includes the border by the rim as well, but the handful of mules using an incorrect obverse design do not.

Most coins feature the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia in the center of the obverse, the Latin "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA" printed clockwise at the left periphery, and the Cyrillic "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" inscribed in the same direction at the right boundary. The two legends are separated from one another by a group of four diamond at the top of the piece. Written in a large incuse font at the bottom of the coin is the numeral "100", which indicates the coin's face value. It is flanked to the left by a Latin "D", which is abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian word "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV", and to the right by a Cyrillic "Д" (de), which represents the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari).

Some mule coins instead use the obverse design of the "1985" 100 dinar piece celebrating Yugoslavia's liberation in World War II. This obverse shows the emblem of SFR Yugoslavia in the middle, enclosed within a solid, mostly circular border with a horizontal border at the bottom. Printed outside this boundary, extending clockwise along the piece's left rim, is the Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is engraved in the same direction at the right periphery, separated from the Cyrillic text by a small diamond at the top of the coin. A large numeral "100" indicating the piece's face value is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the coin, flanked to the left by a small Cyrillic "Д" (de) and to the right by a small Latin "D".

A right-facing bust of a mustached Karadžić wearing a traditional cap is depicted in the center of both coin's reverses. The Cyrillic Serbo-Croatian legend "ДВЕСТА ГОДИНА ОД РОЂЕЊА ВУКА КАРАЏИЋА" (Romanized: dvesta godina od rođenja Vuka Karadžića), which translates to English as "two hundredth anniversary of the birth of Vuk Karadžić", is engraved in a clockwise direction from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries. The Gregorian date of minting, "1987", is printed horizontally at the bottom of the piece, separating the beginning and end of the Cyrillic legend.

A total of 200,000 proof examples were produced, including normal coins and mules. Of these, an unknown quantity were distributed in blue hinged boxes with a certificate of authenticity. Because mules are considerably rarer than their standard counterparts, they tend to sell for higher prices.

Second circulation coin (1988–1989)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1989

1989 coin

On account of rising inflation, by the end of 1988 all Yugoslav coins valued between 25 para and 5 dinara were demonetized and withdrawn, leaving only 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinar coins in circulation. On November 15 of that year, the National Bank of Yugoslavia issued a new series of pieces in these denominations to supplement the coins already in circulation. They were used for a short period of time before being demonetized on December 31, 1989. All of the four coins were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 100 dinar piece, which was struck into 1989, is composed of a brass alloy of 75 percent copper, 21 percent zinc, and 4 percent nickel. It measures 5.5 grams in mass, 24.1 millimeters in diameter, and 1.7 mm in thickness. The coin has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of the piece's rims are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia appears in the middle of the obverse. The Cyrillic legend "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА" revolves clockwise above the emblem, while the Latin "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA" travels in the opposite direction below the symbol. Separated from one another by two small diamonds, these inscriptions form the outline of a circle. All of the elements within this circular area are enclosed within a square boundary, below which the Gregorian date of minting, "1988" or "1989", is horizontally displayed in smaller print.

A large incuse "100" is displayed inside a raised square area in the center of the reverse. Printed by each of the square's sides are four local translations of the word dinara. At the top of the square, the Serbo-Croatian translation is rendered in Latin script as "DINARA", and at the bottom it is written in Cyrillic as "ДИНАРА". The Slovene "DINARJEV" is printed vertically upward at the square's left side, while the Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari) is inscribed vertically downward at the right side.

Over two consecutive years of production, about 136,870,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, all with a standard finish. Of these, an undisclosed amount were distributed in mint sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1988 12,610,000
1989 124,260,000
Total 136,870,000
Trial strikesEdit

Trial strikes of the coin were produced in 1988 on a brass planchet and in 1989 on copper and copper-plated zinc planchets. All of the trials have the same diameter as the issued coin. The brass trial has the same mass, but the copper-plated piece is lighter, having a mass of 4.9 grams.

Coins of the convertible dinar (1990)Edit

29th Chess Olympiad coin (1990)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1990 chess

1990 commemorative coin

The Chess Olympiad, an international chess tournament featuring countries from around the world, has been held since 1927. Originally occurring at irregular intervals, the competition has been held biennially since 1950. Each year the Chess Olympiad is held at a different venue, allowing multiple countries and cities the opportunity to host the tournament. During its existence, SFR Yugoslavia hosted the competition three times. The 9th Chess Olympiad was held in Dubrovnik (now in Croatia) in 1950, followed by the 20th in Skopje (now in Macedonia) in 1972, and the 29th in Novi Sad (now in Serbia) in 1990.

In celebration of the 29th Chess Olympiad in Novi Sad, on October 16, 1990, the National Bank of Yugoslavia issued commemorative coins in denominations of 5, 100, 150, and 1,500 dinara. They were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins in Belgrade and designed by Serbian artist Dragomir Mileusnić.

The 100 dinar coins of the series is composed of .925 fine silver and measures 13 grams in mass and 30 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. The rims on both sides of the piece are raised and undecorated.

The emblem of SFR Yugoslavia is illustrated in the center of the coin's obverse, where it is enclosed within a solid, mostly circular boundary with a horizontal border at the bottom. Printed outside this boundary, extending clockwise along the piece's left rim, is the Cyrillic state title "СФР ЈУГОСЛАВИЈА". Its Latin equivalent, "SFR JUGOSLAVIJA", is inscribed in the same direction at the right periphery, separated from the Cyrillic legend by a small diamond at the top of the coin. A large numeral "100" indicating the piece's face value is displayed horizontally at the bottom of the coin, flanked by a small Cyrillic "Д" (de) to the left and a small Latin "D" to the right. These are respectively abbreviated for the Serbo-Croatian "ДИНАРА" and Macedonian "ДИНАРИ" (dinari), and the Serbo-Croatian "DINARA" and Slovene "DINARJEV".

The Petrovaradin clock tower in Novi Sad is displayed in the middle of the reverse, the squares of a chessboard engraved in the background. Printed horizontally above the board is the Gregorian date of minting, "1990", and written vertically upward to the left of the object is the inscription "NOVI SAD". All of the aforementioned reverse elements are surrounded by a solid circular border, outside of which the Serbo-Croatian legend "29. ŠAHOVSKA OLIMPIJADA" is engraved clockwise at the coin's upper boundary. Its English equivalent, "THE 29th CHESS OLYMPIAD", is printed in the opposite direction at the lower rim, separated from the other legend by a small square on both sides of the reverse.

A total of 10,000 proof examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production. Of these, an undisclosed amount were distributed in official proof sets by the National Bank of Yugoslavia.

Coins of the 1993 dinar (1993)Edit

Circulation coin (1993)Edit

Yugoslavia 100 dinara 1993 im2

1993 coin

Because of hyperinflation in Yugoslavia during late 1989, the country's central bank revalued the dinar on January 1, 1990, creating what became known as the Yugoslav convertible dinar. Economic problems continued into the next few years, as four of the six constituent republics of SFR Yugoslavia broke away from the South Slavic country, becoming what are now the nations of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, and Slovenia. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was then founded from the union of the republics of Serbia and Montenegro in 1992.

By early 1992, hyperinflation in FR Yugoslavia had resurfaced, prompting the National Bank of Yugoslavia to revalue the dinar again, establishing the Yugoslav reformed dinar. Shortly afterward, another period of hyperinflation devastated the economy of FR Yugoslavia, forcing another revaluation on October 1, 1993. On this date, the National Bank of Yugoslavia introduced a series of coins in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinara. A 500 dinar piece was evidently planned, but was never released into circulation. By November 31, 1993, nearly two months after they were introduced, the coins were withdrawn from circulation and demonetized due to their limited use. All of the pieces were struck at the Institute for Manufacturing Banknotes and Coins.

The 100 dinar coin of the series is composed of a brass alloy of 75 percent copper, 23 percent zinc and 2 percent nickel, and measures 5.1 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. The rims of both sides of the piece are raised and form the outline of an octagon, and are decorated with a beaded border.

The emblem of the National Bank of Yugoslavia – which consists of a monogram inside a solid rectangular boundary – is displayed in the center of the obverse. This monogram in the emblem consists of the Cyrillic letters "НБЈ", the initials of "Народна банка Југославије" (Romanized: Narodna banka Jugoslavije), the bank's name in Serbo-Croatian. The Latin legend "SR JUGOSLAVIJA", shortened for Savezna Republika Jugoslavija (English: "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia"), is displayed above the emblem, arched in a clockwise direction along the upper periphery. Its Cyrillic equivalent, "СР JУГОСЛАВИJА", an abbreviation for "Савезна Република Југославија", is written below the central depiction, extending in the opposite direction at the coin's lower rim.

A large numeral "100" is engraved in the middle of the coin's reverse, the Cyrillic word "ДИНАРА" written in smaller print above, and its Latin counterpart, "DINARA", displayed in the same size font below. Inscribed below that in slightly smaller print is the Gregorian date of minting, "1993".

During a single year of production, about 14,294,500 examples of the coin were produced, all with a standard finish.

ReferencesEdit

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Yugoslav dinar
Banknotes ¼ D½ D1 D2 D5 D10 D20 D25 D50 D100 D200 D500 D1,000 D5,000 D10,000 D20,000 D50,000 D100,000 D500,000 D1,000,000 D2,000,000 D5,000,000 D10,000,000 D50,000,000 D100,000,000 D500,000,000 D1,000,000,000 D5,000,000,000 D10,000,000,000 D50,000,000,000 D500,000,000,000 D
Coins 1 p5 p10 p20 p25 p50 p1 D2 D5 D10 D20 D50 D100 D150 D200 D250 D300 D350 D400 D500 D600 D1,000 D1,500 D2,000 D2,500 D3,000 D5,000 D6,000 D10,000 D20,000 D40,000 D50,000 D100,000 D2,000,000 D

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Miscellaneous DinarHyperinflationInstitute for Manufacturing Banknotes and CoinsLanguages and currencyNational Bank of YugoslaviaParaYugoslav leaders on currencyYugoslav mint setsYugoslav proof sets

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