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Mexican 1 peso coin

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1879 Flowing Hair Stella reverse
1 peso
MXN 1p 2003
Coin from 2003
General information
Country

Flag of Mexico Mexico
Bandera del Segundo Imperio Mexicano (1864-1867) Second Mexican Empire
United Mexican States (pattern)

Value

1.00 pesos

Years
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Measurements and composition
Mass
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  • 27.07 g (1866–1914)
  • 1.692 g (1870–1905)
  • 18.13 g (1918–1919)
  • 16.6 g (1920–1945)
  • 14 g (1947–1949)
  • 13.33 g (1950)
  • 16 g (1957–1967)
  • 9.07 g (1970–1984)
  • 5.9 g (1983–1987)
  • 7.77 g (1993–1998 bullion)
  • 3.95 g (1992–present)
Diameter
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  • 37 mm (1866–1867)
  • 39 mm (1910–1914)
  • 34 mm (1918–1945)
  • 32 mm (1947–1950)
  • 34.5 mm (1957–1967)
  • 28.98 mm (1970–1984)
  • 24 mm (1983–1987)
  • 26.8 mm (1993–1998 bullion)
  • 21 mm (1992–present)
Composition
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Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

coin

Obverse
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Reverse
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  • Coat of arms of Imperial Mexico, value, year (1866–1867)
  • Phrygian cap, scales, law, sword, value, year (1869–1873)
  • Wreath, value (1870–1905)
  • Phrygian cap, value, year (1898–1909)
  • Liberty on horseback, year (1910–1914)
  • Phrygian cap, value, year, wreath (1918–1945)
  • José María Morelos (1947–1987)
  • varies (1993–1998 bullion)
  • Value, year (1992–present)
v · d · e

The 1 peso coin was first issued by the Second Mexican Empire from 1866 to 1867, during the reign of Emperor Maximilian I, even though an unissued pattern coin of the denomination was struck by the original United Mexican States several years earlier in 1842. In 1869, two years after the execution of Maximilian and the establishment of the current United Mexican States, a new issue of the 1 peso coin was introduced. From that point forward, the country has continued to issue 1 peso coins. The peso coin is now the oldest denomination of coined Mexican currency still circulating, following the discontinuation of the 1 centavo coin in 1973.[1]

HistoryEdit

1842 patternEdit

The Mexican Mint was commissioned by the original United Mexican States to strike 1 peso pattern coins in 1842. At the time, the word "peso" was often used as a colloquial expression for the 8 real, or piece of eight, coins of Mexico and Spain. The coin, which is today considered extremely rare, is composed of silver. An eagle, likely the coat of arms of the United Mexican States, is featured on the obverse, while a Phrygian cap, a symbol of liberty often depicted on Mexican coins of the period, is displayed on the reverse.

Peso coins of Maximilian I (1866-1867)Edit

1 peso de México de 1866 (anverso y reverso)

The first 1 peso coin.

The Second Mexican Empire under the rule of Emperor Maximilian I issued the first circulated Mexican 1 peso coin from 1866 to 1867. The coin is composed of .903 fine silver (90.3% silver, 9.7% copper). It weighs 27.07 grams and measures 37 millimeters in diameter and 2.5 millimeters in thickness. A right-facing effigy of a bearded Maximilian is displayed on the obverse, accompanied by the caption "MAXIMILIANO EMPERADOR" ("Emperor Maximilian") and a small ribbon. The coat of arms of the Second Mexican Empire, which consisted of an image of a Golden Eagle devouring a snake on a prickly pear cactus inside a crowned circular frame supported by two griffins, is depicted on the reverse. Above the arms is the title "IMPERIO MEXICANO" ("Mexican Empire"). Below the left griffin is the coin's value, and below the right is the year of minting and the mint mark. A "Go" mark represents the Guanajuato Mint an "Mo" signifies Mexico City, and a "Pi" identifies San Luis Potosí. The variety struck with an "Mo" is the most common, partly because it was the only variant that was struck into 1867.

At least six similar 1 peso pattern coins composed of silver, silver-plated copper, copper, cupronickel, or lead were minted in 1866 at Mexico City.

First issues of the Second Mexican Republic (1869-1905)Edit

1 peso de San Luis Potosí de 1871 (anverso y reverso)

A silver coin from 1871.

Following Emperor Maximilian's execution and the consequential dissolution of the Second Mexican Empire, the current United Mexican States was established in 1867. In 1869, during the presidency of Benito Juárez, the 1 peso coin was reintroduced. This coin is composed of .903 fine silver and weighs approximately 27.073 grams. The coat of arms of Mexico, which was reverted back to its pre-imperial form in 1867, is featured on the obverse, with the title "REPUBLICA MEXICANA." ("Mexican Republic") inscribed above and the year of minting written below. A radiating Phrygian cap with the word "LIBERTAD" ("liberty") on its band is displayed on the reverse. Below are three items that together represent law: a scroll bearing the word "LEY" ("law"), a sword, and a weighing scale. At the bottom of the reverse near the coin's rim is the value "UN PESO", the mint mark, and an indicator of the coin's silver purity. Coins were produced at mints in Mexico City (Mo), San Luis Potosí (Pi), and Oaxaca (Oa) from 1869 to 1873; Culiacan (Cn), Durango (Do), Guadalajara (Ga), Guanajuato (Go), and Zacatecas (Zs) from 1870 to 1873; and Chihuahua (CH) from 1872 to 1873.

Mexico peso 1902

A gold 1 peso coin from 1902.

A new 1 peso coin was introduced in 1870, only a year after the introduction of the silver coin, which it circulated alongside for a short period of time. Production of the earlier coin ceased in 1873, but the new coin continued to be struck until 1905. This coin is composed of .875 fine gold. It weighs approximately 1.692 grams and measures less than 1 millimeter in thickness. Similar to the coin first issued in 1869, it features the coat of arms of Mexico on the reverse, along with the state title of the Mexican Republic and the year. The value, written as "1 PESO", is displayed in the center of the reverse, with the gold purity and mint mark inscribed above and a wreath engraved below. Coins were produced at Alamos (As) and Chihuahua (Ca) in 1888 only, in Culiacan (Cn) from 1873 to 1905, in Guanajuato (Go) from 1870 to 1900, in Hermosillo (Ho) from 1875 to 1888, in Mexico City (Mo) from 1870 to 1905, and in Zacatecas from 1872 to 1890.

Copper and silver patterns of the silver coin were struck at Mexico City in 1869. These were followed by various unrelated patterns minted in copper, silver, and white metal from 1871 to 1889.

1896-1898 pattern coinsEdit

Between 1896 and 1898, a few Mexican mints produced a variety of non-circulated pattern coins, each listed in the Standard Catalog of World Coins but not listed as similar to any circulated issue, either due to the omission of such information or the unattributability of the patterns to any issued coin. Silver patterns were struck at Guanajuato and Mexico City in 1896. The following year, coins of the same composition were produced at Culiacan and Mexico City. Two 1 peso patterns were minted at Mexico City in 1898: a bronze and silver coin. The bronze coin features the coat of arms of Mexico in the center of the obverse, with the title "REPUBLICA MEXICANA" written above and the year of minting inscribed below. A left-facing depiction of the goddess Liberty donning a band with the word "LIBERTY" on her head is featured on the reverse. The value and "Mo" mint mark are displayed to the left of the image, and the planned silver purity of the finished coin is written to the right. The Krause catalogs do not indicate whether the silver pattern of 1898 used the same designs as the bronze coin or if it bore its own.

1898 to 1909 issueEdit

Un Peso Mexico 1908

A one-peso coin from 1908.

The Republic of Mexico introduced a new 1 peso coin during the presidency of Porfirio Díaz in 1898. It continued to be struck until 1909. This coin is composed of .903 fine silver, weighs 27.073 grams, and measures 39 millimeters in diameter. The coat of arms of Mexico is featured on the obverse, with the title "REPUBLICA MEXICANA" written above. Displayed in the center of the reverse is a radiating Phrygian cap with the word "LIBERTAD" ("liberty") printed along the band. Underneath it is the value, mint mark, year, and silver purity. Unlike the earlier 1 peso coins, the coin issued from 1898 to 1909 was only produced at four mints: Culiacan (Cn), Guanajuato (Go), Mexico City (Mo), and Zacatecas (Zs). Mexico City struck at least 118,678,000 examples, including approximately 10,250,000 restrikes from 1949 that can be distinguished from the originals by the number of beads on the reverse (originals have 139 beads while restrikes only have 134). At least 11,579,000 examples were struck at Culiacan from 1898 to 1905, and during the same interval, 36,027,000 were produced at Zacatecas. Coins from Guanajuato were only made from 1898 to 1900, and during these three years, at least 8,952,000 1 peso coins were minted at the city.

Krause's Standard Catalog of World Coins gives mention to an aluminum 1904 1 peso pattern coin. However, it does not indicate whether or not the pattern is related to the 1 peso coin that was issued at the time.

"Caballito" peso (1910-1914)Edit

Un Peso Mexico 1913

A "Caballito" peso from 1913.

The famous "Caballito" (Spanish for "horse") peso was introduced in 1910, a year after production of the previous coin ended. It continued to be minted until 1914. The coin, which is today regarded as one of the most appealing and most sought after Mexican pieces, was designed by French engraver Charles Pillet. It commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Mexican War of Independence, which was fought from 1810 to 1821 between Mexico and Spain. The coin, like its predecessors, is composed of .903 fine silver, weighs 27.07 grams, and measures 39 millimeters in diameter. The Mexican coat of arms is featured on the obverse. The title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" is displayed above, and the value is written below the eagle, with the words "UN" and "PESO" being separated by the stem of the cactus. A depiction of the goddess Liberty mounted on a horse is present on the reverse. In her right hand is an olive branch, a symbol of peace or victory, and in her left is a torch, a representation of enlightenment and hope. In the background of the reverse, the sun and several sun rays are visible. The year is inscribed at the bottom of the reverse, and unlike earlier 1 peso coins, the coin does not bear a mint mark to indicate the mint where it was struck. The "Caballito" peso was only minted at Mexico City, where at least 8,363,000 examples were produced.

Brass, bronze, bronze-plated lead, and silver patterns of the "Caballito" peso were produced from 1908 to 1911.

1918 to 1945 issuesEdit

Un Peso Mexico 1919

Coin from 1919

1 peso de México de 1924 (anverso y reverso)

Coin from 1924

In 1918, during the late presidency of Venustiano Carranza, Mexico introduced a new 1 peso coin. It was minted until 1919, and was replaced the following year by a similar coin, which only differed from its predecessor by its silver content and weight. This newer coin was struck until 1945. Both coins measure 34 millimeters in diameter. The 1918-1919 1 peso coin is composed of .800 fine silver and weighs 18.1299 grams, while the later coin is made of .7199 silver and weighs only 16.66 grams. The coat of arms of Mexico is depicted on the obverse, with the title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" engraved above. On coins struck from 1920 to 1945, the silver content is also present, with the numbers being separated by the eagle's head. A radiating Phrygian cap with the word "LIBERTAD" on its band is featured at the top center of the reverse. Directly below is a small "M" mint mark, and underneath that is the value "UN PESO" and the year of minting. A wreath is also displayed on the reverse, along the coin's bottom periphery. The words "INDEPENDENCIA Y LIBERTAD" (English: "Independence and Liberty") are inscribed along the edge. From 1918 to 1919, at least 9,201,000 1 peso coins were produced, excluding a small number of error coins from 1918 with the date stamped over a "1917". At least 458,624,000 examples were minted from 1920 to 1945. An error coin with the date "1920" stamped over a "1910", and a similar one with a "1933" stamped over a "1932" were issued in addition to their standard counterparts. Also, two varieties of the 1932 1 peso coin are known to exist: one with a closed "9" in the date and the other with an open "9". The overdated varieties are considered more valuable to collectors than the other varieties, while the 1932 dated-coins are the most inexpensive varieties because the Mexican Mint emitted a large amount of 1 peso coins that year.

1947 to 1949 coinEdit

Mexico 1 peso 1947

A one-peso coin from 1947.

In 1947, during the second year of Miguel Alemán Valdés' presidency, Mexico issued a new 1 peso coin that effectively replaced its predecessor. It was minted for circulation until 1948, even though production did not fully cease until 1949. The coin is composed of .500 fine silver, weighs 14 grams, and measures approximately 32 millimeters in diameter. A newer design of the coat of arms of Mexico is displayed on the obverse, with the legend "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" inscribed above. A right-facing portrait of Generalisimo José María Morelos, a Mexican revolutionary who led the Mexican War of Independence movement from 1811 to 1815, is featured on the reverse. Directly underneath his likeness is the caption "MORELOS". The coin's value (as "UN PESO"), the year of minting, an "Mo" mint mark, and the silver content are inscribed along the coin's rim below Morelos' portrait. A total of at least 88,375,000 examples were produced, excluding an unknown number of proofs minted in 1949. Coins bearing the date 1949 are considerably more valuable than those produced in 1947 or 1948 because they were not released for circulation.

A silver pattern similar to the 1947-1949 1 peso coin was produced in 1936. The obverse is identical to that of the circulated coin, but the obverse differs considerably. It features the same portrait of Morelos, but aligned to the right instead of the center. Around the coin's left edge is the silver purity (evidently 0.720), the value, and the year of minting. A pattern very similar to the peso coin circulated from 1947 to 1948 was struck in 1947. On the circulated coin, the value, followed by the year, the mint mark, and the silver purity, is displayed on the obverse underneath Morelos, whereas on the pattern, the mint mark is printed first, and then followed by the silver purity (.720), the value, and the year. The pattern also differs from its circulated counterpart because the "Mo" mint mark is also included on its reverse, just above the eagle's head. A third unissued coin similar to the 1947 pattern was produced during the same year. It features a left-facing likeness of Benito Juárez on its reverse, with the silver purity (.720), value, year, and mint mark inscribed above in the order listed.

1950 coinEdit

Mexico 1 peso 1950

The 1950 coin

The Mexican Mint minted another new 1 peso coin in 1950. The coin is composed of a low .300 fine silver. It weighs 13.33 grams and measures 32 millimeters in diameter and 2 millimeters in thickness. The same coat of arms from the previous coin is featured on the reverse, with the state title inscribed above. A different, left-facing image of José María Morelos is displayed on the reverse. The value, written as "1 PESO", is located to the left of Morelos' likeness, with the year and "Mo" mint mark of the Mexican Mint displayed below. The coin does not feature its silver content like many of its predecessors, possibly because it contains a fairly small amount of precious metal. The Mexican Mint produced a total of approximately 3,287,000 examples.

1957 to 1967 circulated issueEdit

Un peso 1958 Mexico

A coin from 1958.

The United Mexican States introduced its ninth general issue 1 peso coin in 1957. It then continued to be struck every year by the Mexican Mint until 1967. The coin is composed of a low .100 fine silver. It weighs approximately 16 grams and measures 34.5 millimeters in diameter and 2.3 millimeters in thickness. The coat of arms of Mexico, surrounded by a wreath, is featured in the center of the obverse. Outside of the wreath is the state title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS", the coin's value, and the year of minting. A right-facing likeness of José Marìa Morelos is featured in the middle of the reverse, with the "Mo" mint mark printed to the left of the image. A wreath is engraved around the coin's periphery, starting at the bottom and extending upwards to Morelos' head. The words "INDEPENDENCIA Y LIBERTAD" are inscribed along the coin's edge. During eleven years of production, at least 324,814,000 examples were minted.

The Mexican Mint produced a cupronickel pattern peso coin in 1955 that bears a similar reverse design to that of the 1 peso coin issued from 1957 to 1967. It measures 32 millimeters in diameter. The Mexican coat of arms is displayed on the obverse, while a right-facing image of José Marìa Morelos is featured on the reverse, with the value, mint mark, and year inscribed around the coin's upper rim.

1957 commemorative coinEdit

100 years of Constitution Mexico

1957 commemorative coin

In 1957, the Bank of Mexico commissioned the Mexican Mint to strike commemorative 1 peso coins celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the Federal Constitution of the United Mexican States of 1857. Like the general issue 1 peso coin it accompanied, the 1957 commemorative is composed of .100 fine silver, weighs 16 grams, and measures 34.5 millimeters in diameter. The obverse is identical to that of the 1957 general issue, featuring the coat of arms of Mexico surrounded by a wreath and accompanied by the state title of Mexico, the coin's value, and the year of minting. A left-facing portrait of Benito Juárez, former Mexican president and signatory of the Constitution of 1857, is featured on the reverse. To the right of his likeness is the "Mo" mint mark of the Mexican Mint. The text "CENTENARIO DE LA CONSTITUCION DE MEXICO" (English: "100th anniversary of the Constitution of Mexico") and the dates "1857" and "1957" are inscribed around the coin's rim, encircling Juárez's image. The words "INDEPENDENCIA Y LIBERTAD" are printed along the edge. Being a commemorative issue, production for the coin was limited to only 500,000 pieces.

First non-silver issue (1970-1983)Edit

1 peso 1980

The first non-silver one-peso coin.

Mexico issued a 1 peso coin from 1970 to 1983 that was unlike any circulated coin of the denomination that came before it. The coin is made of cupronickel instead of silver. It weighs 9 grams and has a diameter of 29 millimeters. The linear Seal of the United Mexican States, including the words "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS", is present on the obverse. A portrait of José María Morelos facing left is present at the right side of the reverse. The value "UN PESO" is inscribed to the left of the image, the "Mo" mint mark of the Mexican Mint is featured to the right, and the year of minting is printed below. A large quantity of these coins were struck by the Mexican Mint in several different varieties over a span of fourteen years. For 1970 and 1979, coins with narrow and wide dates were produced. Similarly, in 1975, "short wide date" and "tall narrow date" varieties were made, and in 1977, "thick" and "thin" date coins were minted. For the years 1978, 1980, 1981, and 1982, varieties exist with an open and closed "8" in the date. There are three known varieties for 1983: a "narrow date" variety, a "wide date" variety, and a proof variety.

Two cupronickel patterns of the coin were produced in 1969. One of the patterns features the value to the right of Morelos' head instead of to the left, while the other uses a slightly different portrait than the one used on the circulated coin.

1980 pattern coinEdit

A brass 1 peso pattern coin was struck by the Mexican Mint in 1980. The coat of arms of Mexico and the words "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" are featured on the obverse. A left-facing image of an eagle warrior, a special class of soldier in the Aztec army, and a pyramid of Tenochtitlan is displayed on the reverse. The word "TENOCHTITLAN" is inscribed in small print above the eagle warrior, and the date and mint mark are written below in a larger font. The value is displayed to the left of the warrior, where it is written vertically as "$1". The coin was likely intended to accompany the 5 and 20 peso coins circulating at the time, which also included images relating to ancient Mesoamerican cultures.

1984 to 1987 issueEdit

1 peso 1986

A 1986 coin

Mexico issued its second circulated non-silver 1 peso coin from 1984 to 1987. Unlike the 1970-1983 coin, the coin introduced in 1984 is composed of stainless steel. It weighs approximately 5.7 grams and measures 24.5 millimeters in diameter and 1.85 in thickness. The current coat of arms of Mexico is featured on the obverse, with the title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" written above. A right-facing depiction of an armored José María Morelos is featured at the left of the reverse. To the left of this image is the "Mo" mint mark of the Mexican Mint. To the right, adjacent to Morelos' neck is the value, inscribed as "1$", with the year of minting printed below. Around the upper periphery of the coin's reverse is the caption "josé ma morelos" in a lowercase, block-style font. A total of at least 2,697,802,002 examples were produced at the mint in San Luis Potosí, two of which were struck in proof quality in 1987. These two proofs are significantly more valuable than their standard counterparts.

Twelve examples of a stainless steel pattern coin using the same designs were produced in 1983.

1985 to 1986 pattern coinsEdit

The Mexican Mint produced pattern peso coins in 1985 and 1986, likely with the intent of replacing the 1 peso coin that was circulating at the time. The 1985 coin is composed of bronze and was minted in unknown quantities. The pattern minted in 1986 is composed of stainless steel. It features the coat of arms of Mexico on the obverse, with the state title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" written above. The design used on many independence-era insurrectionist coins of Oaxaca, which consists of the legend "SUD" underneath an upward-facing bow and arrow, is displayed at the left of the reverse, with a flower engraved below. At the right of the coin is an "Mo" mint mark, the date, and the value. In total, approximately 33 examples of this 1986 pattern were produced.

Pre-Columbian bullion coin series (1993-1998)Edit

The Bank of Mexico introduced its pre-Columbian bullion coin series in 1992, and disbanded it in 1998. The lowest-denominated coin of the series was the 1 peso coin. These non-circulated collector's 1 peso pieces are composed of .999 fine silver, weigh 7.77 grams, and measure 26.8 millimeters in diameter. On the obverse of each coin is the coat of arms of Mexico and the state title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" engraved within a frame, the shape of which depending on the issue. Underneath the frame are the inscriptions "¼ ONZA DE PLATA" (English: "¼ ounce of silver") and "LEY 0.999", both of which indicate the coin's silver content and purity. The value, inscribed as "N$1" from 1993 to 1994, and as just "$1" from 1996 to 1998, is displayed underneath the purity, near the coin's rim.

Aztec series coin (1993)Edit

The "Aztec" subseries of coins commemorated the indigenous Aztecs of Mexico, who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica from the 14th to 16th centuries. It started in 1992 and continued until 1993. During the latter of these two years, the 1 nuevo peso coin of the series was introduced. A right-facing portrait of an eagle warrior is featured in the center of a D-shaped circle. To the left of the image is either an "Mo" mint mark or no mint mark, depending on whether the coin was struck in proof quality or not. To the right is the date "1993", and below is the caption "GUERRERO ÁGUILA" (English: "eagle warrior"). Surrounding the frame is a border of cocoa beans. In total, approximately 2400 examples were minted: 900 in proof quality (no mint mark) and 1500 in uncirculated condition (with mint mark).

Central Veracruz series coin (1993)Edit

Following the conclusion of the previous "Aztec series", a new "Central Veracruz series" of coins was launched and concluded in 1993. It commemorated the Classic Veracruz culture, which thrived from about 100 to 1000 AD. A bas-relief image of a deity of Central Veracruz from El Tajín is featured inside a D-shaped frame on the reverse. The date is inscribed at the upper left of the image, and the "Mo" mint mark of the Mexican Mint is printed at the upper right. Underneath the bas-relief is the text "BAJORRELIEVE DE EL TAJÍN" (English: "bas-relief of El Tajín"). Surrounding the frame is a decorative border. In total, approximately 104,010 examples were produced: 100,005 in uncirculated condition and 4005 with a proof finish.

Mayan series coin (1994)Edit

Chaac Mool coin

Mayan series bullion coin

The Bank of Mexico continued its pre-Columbian series in 1994, when it introduced its new "Mayan" series of bullion coins. These coins commemorate the Maya civilization, which was established from circa 2000 BC to 250 AD and eventually declined upon the arrival of the Spanish starting in the 16th century. The 1 nuevo peso coin of the series features an image of a Chac Mool, a type of stone statue often found in and around post-Classic Maya sites with heavy Toltec influence, in the center of a hexagonal frame surrounded by a decorative border. To the left of the statue is the coin's year of minting, and to the right is the mint mark. The caption "CHAAC-MOOL" is inscribed below. A total of about 32,500 pieces were struck: 30,000 in matte, uncirculated quality and 2500 in proof quality.

Olmec series coin (1996-1998)Edit

After a year of pause, the Bank of Mexico continued its pre-Columbian bullion coin series in 1996 with a series commemorating the Olmec civilization, which flourished circa 1500 BC to about 400 BC. The series' 1 peso coin was later struck again in 1998. An image of Las Limas Monument 1, commonly referred to as the "Señor de las Limas" in Spanish, is engraved in the center of a square-shaped frame surrounded by a decorative border on the obverse. To the statue's left is the year of minting, and to the right is the "Mo" mint mark. Underneath the figure is the inscription "SEÑOR DE LAS LIMAS". A total of approximately 12,500 examples of the coin were struck at San Luis Potosí: 6400 uncirculated and 3700 proof coins in 1996, and 2400 uncirculated pieces in 1998.

Teotihuacan series coin (1997-1998)Edit

In 1997, the Bank of Mexico introduced its fifth series of pre-Columbian bullion coins, which commemorated the Teotihuacan archaeological site located in the Basin of Mexico. Most coins of the series, including its 1 peso coin, continued to be struck until 1998. A depiction of a disk with a skull in its center, an ancient relic recovered from the Pyramid of the Sun, is featured in the middle of the reverse, enclosed within an ovular frame surrounded by a border consisting of twenty objects. To the left of the disk is the year of minting, and to the right is the "Mo" mint mark. At the bottom of the frame, underneath the image of the relic, is the text "DISCO DE LA MUERTE" (English: "death disk"). In total, only 7500 examples of the coin were issued: 3000 uncirculated and 1600 proof specimens in 1997, and 2400 uncirculated and 500 proof coins in 1998.

Tolteca series coin (1998)Edit

The pre-Columbian bullion coin series ended in 1998 with the introduction of a final series commemorating the ancient Toltec culture. An image of a relief of a jaguar, a highly revered animal in indigenous Mesoamerican cultures, including that of the Toltec, is displayed inside a somewhat trapezoidal frame. The year is featured to the left inside the frame, and the "Mo" mint mark is inscribed to the right. Near the bottom edge of the frame is the word "JAGUAR" printed in small lettering. Only approximately 10,100 examples were struck at San Luis Potosí: 6400 uncirculated and 3700 proof pieces.

Circulation coins of the second peso (1992-present)Edit

Mexico nuevo peso 1995

A 1995 "nuevo" peso coin

The Bank of Mexico commissioned the Mexican Mint to commence production of a new 1 peso coin in 1992. These coins would later be issued in 1993, when a new national currency, the nuevo peso, was introduced. The 1 nuevo peso coin consists of an aluminum-bronze center composed of 92% copper, 6% aluminum, and 2% nickel surrounded by a stainless steel outer ring. It weighs a total of 3.95 grams, the ring making up 2.14 of those grams and the center constituting for the remaining 1.81 grams. The coin measures 21 millimeters in diameter and 1.64 in thickness. A majority of the coat of arms of Mexico is engraved in the aluminum-bronze center of the obverse. Above it, inside the stainless steel ring, is the title "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS", and below around the coin's periphery are oak and laurel leaves tied together with a ribbon, the only part of the coat of arms not present in the center. The value, inscribed as "N$1" from 1992 to 1995, and simply "$1" from 1996 to the present, is featured in the center of the reverse, with the year of minting printed above and the "Mo" mint mark of San Luis Potosí engraved to the right. A stylized image of the "Ring of Splendor" in the Aztec calendar stone is detailed on the stainless steel outer ring. At least 819,866,981 1 peso coins bearing the "N$1" value were produced from 1992 to 1995. Three varieties are known for 1995: one with a large date, one with a small date, and one with a proof finish. The large and small date coins have equal valuations to their earlier counterparts, but the proof is worth slightly more than the others. From 1996 to 2010, a reported 3,342,475,000 1 peso coins were struck. Such coins continue to be produced and circulated in Mexico.

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. The first circulated Mexican 1 centavo coin was issued in 1863, only three years prior to the introduction of the 1 peso coin.
 v · d · e
Coat of arms of Mexico Mexican peso
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