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1 centavo
Mexico 1 centavo 1952
Coin from 1952
General information
Country

Flag of Mexico Mexico
Bandera del Segundo Imperio Mexicano (1864-1867) Second Mexican Empire

Value

$0.01

Years
Measurements and composition
Mass
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Diameter
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  • 26.5 mm (1863)[1]
  • 25 mm (1864, 1869-1897)[3][4]
  • 16 mm (1882-1883)[5]
  • 19.5 mm (1899-1949)[6][7]
  • 16 mm (1950-1969)[8]
  • 13 mm (1970-1973)[9]
Composition
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Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

coin

Obverse
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Reverse
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v · d · e

The 1 centavo coin was first minted by Mexico in 1863. During 1864, the Second Mexican Empire introduced a new 1 centavo coin. In 1869, two years after the disestablishment of the Second Mexican Empire, a new design for the 1 centavo coin was used, and in 1883, a short-lived design also circulated. Afterwards, new designs were introduced during 1899 and 1950.

HistoryEdit

First issueEdit

1 centavo de México de 1863 (canto estriado)(anverso y reverso)

The 1863 coin.

In 1863, the first 1 centavo coin was introduced. It was composed of copper, had a mass of 8 grams, and had a diameter of 26.5 millimeters. The edge was reeded. Displayed on the obverse was an image of Liberty seated, with the legend, "LIBERTAD Y REFORMA" ("freedom and reform"). Shown on the reverse was the value and year of minting surrounded by branches. About 1,025,000 of these coins were produced at the San Luis Potosì Mint.[1][2]

Imperial issueEdit

1 centavo de México de 1864 (anverso y reverso)

The imperial 1 centavo coin.

During the first reign of the Second Mexican Empire, a new 1 centavo coin was introduced. Like its predecessor, the coin was composed of copper and had a mass of 8 grams, but had a diameter of 25 millimeters. On the obverse was the coat of arms of Mexico with the state title (IMPERIO MEXICANO). Shown on the reverse was the value and year of minting surrounded by branches.[2][3]

Third coinEdit

1 centavo de México de 1898 (anverso y reverso)

Coin from 1898.

In 1869, two years after the disestablishment of the Second Mexican Empire, the third design of the 1 centavo coin was introduced. It was composed of copper, had a mass of 8.9 grams, a diameter of 25 millimeters, and a thickness of 1.5 millimeters. The edge on earlier coins was reeded, while later coins bore a smooth edge. Displayed on the obverse was the coat of arms of Mexico with the new state title (REPUBLICA MEXICANA). Inscribed on the reverse was the coin's value and year of minting surrounded by branches. They were produced at a number of mints across Mexico. Production of these coins ended in 1897.[2][4]

Cupronickel issueEdit

1 centavo Mexico 1883

The short-lived cupronickel coin.

During 1882, another 1 centavo coin was introduced, which circulated alongside the copper issue that came before it. It was composed of cupronickel (75% copper, 25% nickel), had a mass of 2 grams, and had a diameter of 16 millimeters. On the obverse were a bow, quiver, and macuahuitl with the year of minting. On the reverse was the value (as a Roman numeral) surrounded by a wreath. These coins were very short-lived, having only been minted from 1882 to 1883. A total of 99,955,000 of these coins were produced.[2][5]

Bronze issueEdit

1 centavo de México de 1946 (anverso y reverso)

A 1 centavo coin from 1946.

In 1899, the Republic of Mexico introduced another 1 centavo coin. Until 1915 and from 1944 to 1949, the bronze in the coins was composed of 95% copper, 4% tin, and 1% zinc. Afterward, its composition was changed to being 95% copper, 2.5% tin, and 2.5% zinc. The coin had a mass of 3 grams, with an exception of 1915, where the coin weighed 1.5 grams, and had a diameter 19.5 millimeters. Displayed on the obverse was the coat of arms of Mexico with the state title (as REPUBLICA MEXICANA or "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS"). On the reverse was the value and year of minting surrounded by branches. During 1949, the production of the bronze 1 centavo coins ceased.[2][6][7]

Brass issueEdit

In 1950, Mexico introduced its final design for the 1 centavo coin. These coins were composed of brass (85% copper, 15% zinc). Until 1969, the coin had a diameter of 16 millimeters and a mass of 2 grams, but afterward, the diameter was reduced to 13 millimeters and the mass became 1.5 grams. Displayed on the obverse of the coin was the coat of arms of Mexico with the state title (ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS). Shown on the reverse was an ear of wheat with the year of minting and value of the coin. Production of the coins ceased in 1973.[2][8][9]

ReferencesEdit


 v · d · e
Coat of arms of Mexico Mexican peso
Banknotes $1$2$5$10$20$50$100$200$500$1000$2000$5000$10,000$20,000$50,000$100,000
Coins 10¢20¢25¢50¢$1$2$2.5$5$10$20$25$50$100$200$250$500$1000$2000$5000$10,000$50,000$100,000

1/20 ozt.1/15 ozt.1/10 ozt.¼ ozt.½ ozt.1 ozt.2 ozt.5 ozt.1 kg

Miscellaneous American Banknote CompanyBank of MexicoCentenarioMexican Mint

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