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Egyptian 1 pound coin

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Pound
Kingtutcoin
Coin from 2010
General information
Country

Flag of Egypt Egypt

Used by

Flag of Egypt Egypt
Flag of Palestine Gaza Strip (unofficial)
Flag of Egypt (1922–1958)Flag of the United Kingdom Sudan (1899–1956)

Value

£1.00

Years

1838–present

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 8.5 g (1838-1958)
  • 25 g (1968-1973 silver)
  • 15 g (1974-present silver)
  • 8 g (1970-present gold)
  • 8.5 g (2005-2011)
Diameter
  • 21 mm (1838-1884)
  • 24 mm (1885-present gold)
  • 40 mm (1968-1973 silver)
  • 35 mm (1974-present silver)
  • 25 mm (2005-2011)
Thickness
  • 3 mm (1968-1973 silver)
  • 2 mm (1974-present silver)'
  • 2.5 mm (2005-2011)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

medallic

Edge

reeded

Obverse

See text

Reverse

See text

v · d · e

The 1 pound coin (alternatively 1 gineh and at periods 100 qirsh or 100 ersh) is a current circulation and commemorative coin of the modern Arab Republic of Egypt and its precursors. The first pieces of the denomination were made during Egypt's period as an eyalet of the Ottoman Empire, and then during the time of the Ottoman khedivate. Examples were made from 1838 to 1839, 1839 to 1853, 1861 to 1875, in mid 1876, and from late 1876 to 1888, respectively during the reigns of Sultans Mahmud II (1789–1839), Abdülmecid I (1823–1861), Abdülaziz (1830–1876), Murad V (1840–1904), and Abdülhamid II (1842–1918). The next Egyptian pound coin would not be struck until 1916, during the reign of Hussein Kamel (1853–1917) of the short-lived Sultanate of Egypt. Under Hussein Kamal's successor, Fuad I (1868–1936), a kingdom was established in Egypt in 1922, and in this year the monarch introduced his first pound coin. This was accompanied from 1929 to 1930 by a new type under Fuad, and then in 1938 by another under his son and successor, Farouk I (1920–1965). The succeeding Republic of Egypt introduced commemorative pound pieces in 1955 and 1957, and the current Arab Republic of Egypt has been producing memorial coins of the denomination since 1968. A 1 pound circulation coin was introduced in 2005, and subsequently produced in a new subtype from 2007 to 2011. All of the pieces, excluding those from the eras of Ottoman control, the Sultanate, and the Kingdom, currently carry a legal tender face value equivalent to 1.00 Egyptian pounds in Egypt and unofficially in the Gaza Strip. Examples produced from 1961 to the present have been distributed and minted by the Central Bank of Egypt.

CoinsEdit

Coins of the Ottoman eraEdit

Coin of Mahmud II (1838–1839)Edit

Tughra of Mahmud II

The tughra of Mahmud II as it appears on the coin

In 1834, during the Egyptian period as an Ottoman eyalet under Sultan Mahmud II, Wāli and self-declared Khedive Muhammad Ali (1769–1849) issued a decree establishing a bimetallic currency to replace the previous piastre. As a result, the pound (genēh) was introduced, divided into 100 piastres (ersh) and 4,000 para. In 1838, during the later reign of Mahmud II, the first 1 pound coin of the currency system was issued, having presumably been struck at a mint in Egypt. It was issued again the previous year in 1839. Such a piece is composed of .875 fine gold, weighs approximately 8.5 grams, and measures 21 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and like most coins, is round in shape.

Engraved in the center of the obverse is the tughra of Sultan Mahmud II, which reads in Ottoman Turkish "محمود عدلى خان بن عبدالحميد مظفر دائماً" (Romanized: Mahmud-u Âdlî Han bin Abdülhamid muzaffer daima), translating to English as "Mahmud II Khan son of Abdülhamid is forever victorious". Engraved horizontally below on two lines is the face value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh), the letter "ش" (šīn) being an abbreviated form of the Arabic denomination name "قرش" (ersh). Written on three lines on the reverse is the Arabic legend "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr), which translates as "struck in Egypt". Above the "ب" (bāʾ) is the regnal year of Mahmud II in which the coin was minted, printed in Eastern Arabic numerals, and below the final word "مصر" (Maṣr) is the Islamic date, also in Eastern Arabic numerals, when Mahmud became Sultan, "١٢٣٣" (1233). Both rims of the coin are raised and decorated with an ornate border.

The total mintage of the pound coin of Mahmud II is currently unknown. Only business strikes are reported to have been produced.

Dates
Regnal Accession Gregorian
٣٠ (30) ١٢٣٣ (1233) (1808) 1838
٣١ (31) 1839

Coins of Abdülmecid I (1839–1854)Edit

Tughra of Abdülmecid I

The tughra of Abdülmecid I as it appears on the coins

Abdülmecid I (Abdul Mejid I) succeeded his father as Ottoman Sultan in 1839, and reigned until his death in 1861. During his rule, Muhammad Ali governed Egypt until 1848, Wāli Ibrahim Pasha (1789–1848) in late 1848, Wāli Abbas I (1812–1854) from 1848 to 1854, and Wāli Sa'id Pasha (1822–1863) from 1854 to 1861. A new 1 pound coin for the monarch was introduced in 1839 and produced annually until 1854, during the administrations of all four of Abdülmecid's subordinates in Egypt. The piece is composed of .875 fine gold and has a mass of 8.5 grams and a diameter of 21 millimeters. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape.

The tughra of Abdülmecid I, which reads "عبد المجيد خان بن محمود مظفر دائماً" (Abdülmecid Han bin Mahmud muzaffer daima) and translates from Ottoman Turkish as "Abdülmecid Khan son of Mahmud is forever victorious", is featured in the center of the coin's obverse. Engraved above the hançer in the tughra is the stem of a rose, which on some examples is fairly large and straight, but on others smaller and more curved. As on the pound of Mahmud, the coin's face value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh) is displayed below the tughra on two lines. Printed on three lines in the middle of the reverse is the text "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr), which is shown in a similar, albeit slightly modified style from Mahmud II's coin. The regnal date of Abdülmecid I in which the coin was produced appears in Eastern Arabic numerals above the "ب" (bāʾ) in the text, whereas the Islamic date when the Sultan ascended the throne is engraved in Eastern Arabic numbers as "١٢٥٥" (1255) below the word "مصر" (Maṣr). On examples with the straight obverse rose, the text on the reverse is larger than on curved rose counterparts. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and decorated with a dentillated border.

The mintages of the coin of Abdülmecid I are currently unknown, but only business strikes are known to exist. Similar 100 ersh pieces dated from the second year of Abdülmecid I were produced in Sudan during the rule of self-proclaimed Mahdi Muhammad Ahmad (1844–1885) around 1885. It can be distinguished from the Egyptian coin by its cruder edge reeding and appearance, and typically by its lighter mass.

Dates
Regnal Accession Gregorian
١ (1) ١٢٥٥ (1255) (1839) 1839
٢ (2) 1840
٣ (3) 1841
٤ (4) 1842
٥ (5) 1843
٦ (6) 1844
٧ (7) 1845
٨ (8)
٩ (9) 1846
١‎٠ (10) 1847
١١ (11) 1848
١٢ (12) 1849
١٣ (13) 1850
١٤ (14) 1851
١٥ (15) 1852
١٦ (16) 1853
١٧ (17) 1854

Coins of Abdülaziz (1861–1875)Edit

Tughra of Abdülaziz

The tughra of Abdülaziz as it appears on the coins

After Abdülmecid I died from health complications in 1861, his younger brother, Abdülaziz (Abdul Aziz), succeeded him as Sultan that year and held the position until 1876. During his reign, Egypt was governed by Wāli Sa'id Pasha from 1861 to 1863 and then by Wāli (later Khedive) Isma'il Pasha (1830–1895) from 1863 to 1876. Two 1 pound coins of Sultan Abdülaziz were issued for circulation, and an additional pattern was struck. One of the coins was minted almost annually until 1875, while the other and the pattern were produced alongside it, solely in 1863. All examples are made of .875 fine gold, weigh approximately 8.5 grams, and measure 21 millimeters in diameter. They have medallic alignment and are round in shape. Circulation examples bear a reeded edge, whereas the pattern of 1863 bears a plain one.

Engraved in the middle of the obverse is the tughra of Sultan Abdülaziz, which reads "عبد العزيز خان بن محمود مظفر دائماً" (Abdülaziz Han bin Mahmud muzaffer daima) in Ottoman Turkish and translates as "Abdülaziz Khan son of Mahmud is forever victorious". On the coin that was issued until 1875, a curved rose stem appears above the hançer in the tughra, but on the other piece and the pattern this decoration is not present. Inscribed horizontally on two lines below the tughra is the face value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh), the letter "ش" (šīn) printed significantly larger than the numeral. The text "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr) appears on three lines in the center of the coin's reverse in a larger size than on the pieces of Mahmud II and Abdülmecid I. The regnal date in which the coin was struck appears in Eastern Arabic numerals above the "ب" (bāʾ) in the inscription, while the Islamic date of Abdülaziz's accession to the Ottoman throne is displayed below the word "مصر" (Maṣr) in Eastern Arabic numbers as "١٢٧٧" (1277). Both rims of the coin are raised and decorated with a dentillated border.

The total mintages of the piece issued from 1861 to 1875 and the pattern are currently unknown. However, a reported 20,000 examples of the 1863 coin without a rose were made, according to the Standard Catalog of World Coins. Only business strikes of the pieces are known to exist.

Dates
Regnal Accession Gregorian
٢ (2) ١٢٧٧ (1277) (1861) 1861
٤ (4) 1863
٥ (5) 1864
٦ (6) 1865
٧ (7) 1866
٨ (8) 1867
٩ (9) 1868
١٠ (10) 1869
١١ (11) 1870
١٢ (12) 1871
١٣ (13) 1872
١٤ (14) 1873
١٥ (15) 1874
١٦ (16) 1875

Coin of Murad V (1876)Edit

Tughra of Murad V

The tughra of Murad V as it appears on the coin

Abdülaziz was deposed by his ministers in 1876, and Murad V, the nephew of Abdülaziz and eldest son of Abdülmecid I, was declared Sultan. During his short 93-day reign, Isma'il Pasha governed Egypt as Khedive. Under Isma'il's authorization, a 1 pound coin was produced in the name of the new Ottoman leader. Like the pieces of Murad's predecessors, it is composed of .875 fine gold, weighs 8.5 grams, and measures approximately 21 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape.

The tughra of Murad V, which reads "محمد مراد خان بن عبد المجيد مظفر دائماً" (Mehmed Murad Han bin Abdülmecid muzaffer daima) in Ottoman Turkish and translates as "Mehmed Murad Khan son of Abdülmecid is forever victorious", is displayed in the center of the coin's obverse. Engraved above the tughra's hançer is a curved rose stem similar in appearance to that appearing on some of the coins of Abdülaziz. Printed horizontally on two lines below the tughra is the value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh), the numeral displayed in a smaller font than the letter "ش" (šīn). "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr) is written on three lines in the middle of the coin's reverse, in a size smaller than on the pound coin of Abdülaziz but larger than on the pieces of Mahmud II and Abdülmecid I. The numeral "١" (1) appears above the letter "ب" (bāʾ) in the legend, identifying production during the first (and only) year of Murad V's reign, and the Islamic date "١٢٩٣" (1293) appears below the word "مصر" (Maṣr), signifying the year in which Murad became Sultan. The rims of both the coin's obverse and reverse are raised and decorated with a dentillated border.

The total mintage of the 1 pound coin of Murad V is currently unknown. Only business strikes are known to have been struck.

Dates
Regnal Accession Gregorian
١ (1) ١٢٩٣ (1293) (1876) 1876

Coins of Abdülhamid II (1876–1888)Edit

Tughra of Abdülhamid II (base)

The tughra of Abdülhamid II as it appears on the coins

Abdülhamid II (Abdul Hamid II), the second-born son of Abdülmecid, succeeded his brother, Murad V, as Ottoman Sultan following the latter's deposition in 1876. Under the monarch, Isma'il Pasha governed Egypt as Khedive until 1879, Tewfik Pasha (1852–1892) ruled from 1879 to 1892, and Abbas II (1874–1944) administrated from 1892 to 1909. Under the earlier two khedives, two pound coins for Abdülhamid II were produced for circulation. The first was introduced in 1876, under Isma'il Pasha, and minted intermittently until 1883, under Tewfik Pasha. The second was produced circa 1888. In addition, an unissued pattern was made in 1887. Both circulated coins are composed of .875 fine gold and weigh approximately 8.5 grams. However, the initial piece measures about 21 millimeters in diameter, whereas the 1888 example measures 24 millimeters. The pattern is made of copper. All pound coins of Abdülhamid II have medallic alignment and are round in shape.

Featured in the center of both circulation coins is the tughra of Abdülhamid II, which reads "عبد الحميد خان بن عبد المجيد مظفر دائماً" (Abdülhamid Han bin Abdülmecid muzaffer daima) in Ottoman Turkish and translates to English as "Abdülhamid Khan son of Abdülmecid is forever victorious". The "الغازي" (El Ghazi), meaning "the veteran", that appears in the Sultan's full tughra above the hançer is not present, nor is the date under the hançer and the "تاريخ" (sânî; English: "second") under the beyze. In place of the missing "الغازي" (El Ghazi) is a curved rose, and written below the tughra on two lines is the value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh). All of the aforementioned elements are displayed smaller on the coin of 1888, which is decorated with a five-notched scalloped floral border near the rim. The text "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr) appears on three lines on both of the coin's reverses, shown in a slightly larger font on the 1888 piece. On the latter of the two coins, the "ب" (bāʾ) lacks the dot below it, and the two dots of the "ي" (yāʼ) are shown to the upper left of the "ر" (rāʾ) as opposed to above it as on the earlier piece. The regnal date in which the coin was minted appears in Eastern Arabic numerals above the letter "ب" (bāʾ), whereas the date of Abdülhamid II's accession is written as "١٢٩٣" (1293) below the word "مصر" (Maṣr). Just like on the obverse of the 1888 example, the reverse is decorated with a five-notched scalloped floral border. The rims of both pieces are raised. However, the earlier dated examples are adorned with a dentillated border while the 1888 pieces bear no ornamentation.

The pattern piece, produced at a mint in Berlin, was designed by Prussian artist Emil Weigand (1837–1906). The tughra of Abdülhamid II that appears on the circulation coins of his reign is featured at the top center of the obverse, a curved rose engraved above the hançer. Written horizontally below the tughra on two lines is the value "ش ١٠٠"‎ (100 sh). A wreath and two crossing quivers full of arrows are displayed along the periphery of the piece, extending from the bottom of the piece to the left and right rims. A small "W", the signature of the artist, is presented at the bottom of the piece, between the bottom periphery and the wreath. The remainder of the coin's rim is occupied by seven five-pointed stars. Printed in thuluth style at the top center of the reverse is the Arabic motto "العدل والانصاف أساس الملك" (al-Adl wa al-Ansaf ássasa al-Mulk), which translates as "Justice and Equity are the Foundations of the Monarchy". Written below that, on three lines, is the common legend "ضرب في مصر" (Ḍáraba fī Maṣr). The regnal date in which the coin was produced, "١١" (11), is printed above the word "العدل" (al-Adl), while the date of Abdülhamid II's accession, "١٢٩٣" (1293), is displayed below "مصر" (Maṣr). Both rims of the 1887 pattern are raised.

The total mintage of the initial pound coin of Abdülhamid II is currently unknown. The Standard Catalog of World Coins reports 4 examples were made in 1881, and classifies pieces from 1879 and 1883 as "rare" and lacks valuations for them. As such, coins from 1876 are considered the most common. The 1888 coin has a reported mintage of 52,000, and as many as 10 1887 patterns are possible to exist.

Dates
Regnal Accession Gregorian
١ (1) ١٢٩٣ (1293) (1876) 1876
٤ (4) 1879
٦ (6) 1881
٨ (8) 1883
١١ (11) 1887
١٢ (12) 1888

Coins of the Sultanate and KingdomEdit

Coin of Hussein Kamel (1916)Edit

In 1914, the British, who occupied Egypt in the 1880s, proclaimed an Egyptian Sultanate and abolished the Khedivate. As a result Egypt became a British protectorate and the Ottoman Empire, then fighting against the United Kingdom in World War I, was weakened. Abbas II was deposed during a state visit to Vienna, and his uncle, Hussein Kamel (1853–1917), was declared Sultan of Egypt. In 1916, under the new monarch, the Egyptian government issued a .875 fine gold 1 pound (100 piastre) coin with the same metrics as the 1888 piece of Abdülhamid II, measuring 8.5 grams in mass and 24 millimeters in diameter. The coin has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape.

Engraved in a large font in thuluth style at the top of the obverse is the Arabic text "حسين كامل السلطان" (Hussein Kamel al-Sultan), which translates literally as "Hussein Kamel, the Sultan". The Islamic date "١٣٣٣" (1333), corresponding to the Gregorian "1914", the date when Hussein Kamel became leader, is written horizontally below the text in a significantly smaller size. A wreath consisting of two branches tied together by a ribbon extends along the periphery of the piece, engraved from the bottom of the piece to the upper left and right rims of the obverse. The value of the piece is fully written out in Arabic as "قرش ١٠٠"‎ (100 ersh) at the top of the reverse on two lines, the numeral and word similar in size. Displayed below this in thuluth, notably larger, is the legend "المصرية السلطنة" (al-Maṣriyya al-Salṭanat), meaning "Egyptian Sultanate". The value in Latin script is shown below on two lines as "100 PIASTRES" with the number displayed in a larger font than the following denomination. Of these, the former is engraved horizontally, while the latter curves slightly downward, in the direction of the wreath underneath. This wreath is similar in design to that appearing on the obverse, occupying the same portions of the rim. However, on the reverse some of the leaves at the right of the illustration are longer and portions of the ribbon are omitted. The Gregorian date of minting is printed in Western Arabic numerals as "1916" along the coin's bottom periphery, to the left of the wreath's ribbon, while the Islamic equivalent is shown as "١٣٣٥" (1335) to the right of the same element, also at the periphery. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

Around 10,000 original business strikes of Hussein Kamel's pound coin were produced, along with an unreported number of proofs. The Standard Catalog of World Coins suggests that restrikes of the piece may exist.

Coins of Fuad I (1922–1930)Edit

Egypt 100 piastres 1922

1922 coin

After Hussein Kamel's death in 1917, his only son and appointed successor, Prince Kamal el Dine Hussein (1874–1932), declined to become Sultan because he opposed the British influence over Egypt. As a result, Hussein Kamel's brother Ahmed Fuad ascended the throne as Fuad I (Fouad I). In 1921, Egypt ceased to be a British protectorate, and in February 1922 it was recognized as a sovereign state. About a month later, Sultan Fuad I declared himself the first King of Egypt, thereby establishing the country as a kingdom. Shortly after adopting his new title in 1922, Fuad introduced the first 1 pound coin of his reign. He then authorized the issuance of a second piece from 1929 to 1930. All three pieces are composed of .875 fine gold, and measure 8.5 grams in mass and 24 millimeters in diameter. They have medallic alignment and reeded edges, and are round in shape.

The 1922 piece was produced at the Birmingham Mint in the United Kingdom, while the 1929 and 1930 pieces were made at the Budapest Mint in Hungary. Displayed in the center of first coin's obverse, designed by Egyptian artist and assay office official Hamid Effendi Sirry, is a right-facing illustration of a mustached Fuad I wearing a tarboosh on his head and a suit and tie on his upper torso. To the left is a small "S" identifying the artist, and to the right, inscribed in a counterclockwise direction from the lower to upper right periphery is the Arabic "فؤاد الأول ملك مصر" (Fu’ād al-Awwal Malik Maṣr), which translates as "Fuad I, King of Egypt". Shown in the middle of the 1929 and 1930 piece's obverse, designed by British artist Percy Metcalfe (1895–1970), is a left-facing mustached illustration of Fuad I wearing a tarboosh on his head and a uniform, along with the chain of the Order of the Nile and shoulder guards, on his upper torso. Engraved in the bottom of the portrait in small print are the "PM" initials of the artist. The title "فؤاد الأول ملك مصر" (Fu’ād al-Awwal Malik Maṣr) is written counterclockwise from the lower right to lower left peripheries of the coin, separated between "الأول" (al-Awwal) and "ملك" (Malik) by the central illustration. The reverse of both coins is identical. Printed in thuluth style in a circular border in the center is the state title "المصرية المملكة" (al-Maṣriyya al-Mamlakah), which translates as "Egyptian Kingdom". The value is written counterclockwise as "١٠٠ قرش"‎ (100 ersh) at the top of the piece, outside of the circular boundary. Inscribed at the piece's lower left boundary is the Islamic date of minting, which is accompanied by the Gregorian equivalent at the lower right boundary, both written in Eastern Arabic numerals. The remaining portions of the periphery are occupied by nine five-pointed stars in three groups of three, one between the two dates, and one between both dates and the value. Both rims of the coin are raised and decorated with a dentillated border.

A total of approximately 25,000 business strikes of the first pound coin of Fuad I were produced, with examples known in both red and yellow gold. Nine thousand business strikes of the second piece were made: 3,000 in 1929 and 6,000 in 1930. Although some of the second pieces are considered to have proof qualities, mint records indicate no proofs were struck.

Mintages
Year Mintage
Islamic Gregorian
١٣٤٠ (1340) ١٩٢٢ (1922) 25,000
١٣٤٨ (1348) ١٩٢٩ (1929) 3,000
١٣٤٩ (1349) ١٩٣٠ (1930) 6,000

Coin of Farouk I (1938)Edit

Egypt 100 piastres pound 1938

1938 coin

In 1936 Fuad I died and his 16-year-old son Farouk succeeded him as king. The young monarch married his first wife, Queen Farida (1921–1988), two years later in 1938. In celebration of this event, that year Farouk authorized the issuance of circulating commemorative 20 and 50 piastre, and 1 and 5 pound pieces. The British Royal Mint, then at Tower Hill, London, was commissioned to strike the pieces. The 1 pound coin of the commemorative series is composed of .875 fine gold, weighs approximately 8.5 grams, and measures 24 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape.

Displayed in the center of the obverse, designed by Percy Metcalfe, is a left-facing illustration of Farouk wearing a tarboosh on his head and a uniform, along with shoulder guards and decorations, on his upper torso. Engraved in small print into the bottom of the King's illustration are the "PM" initials of Metcalfe. The Arabic text "فاروق الأول ملك مصر" (Fārūq al-Awwal Malik Maṣr), which translates as "Farouk I, King of Egypt", is written in a counterclockwise direction along the coin's boundary, commencing at the lower right periphery and concluding at the lower left. Such text is separated between the "الأول" (al-Awwal) and "ملك" (Malik) by the central image. Printed in thuluth style at the top center of a circular border in the middle of the reverse is the state title "المصرية المملكة" (al-Maṣriyya al-Mamlakah), which is displayed in a thicker, less curved font than on the pieces of Fuad I. The Gregorian date "١٩٣٨" (1938) is arched around the border below, followed by its Islamic equivalent, "١٣٥٧" (1357). The two are separated from each other by a small dash. Printed on two lines at the top of the piece, curved partially along the outside of the circular boundary and the coin's rim, is the Arabic value "واحد جنيه"‎ (wāḥida genēh), which translates to English as "one pound". The remainder of the periphery of the reverse is occupied by a floral border consisting of ornamental vines. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised and adorned with a dentillated border.

In total, only 5,000 1 pound coins were produced under King Farouk I, all as business strikes. Varieties in both red and yellow gold are known to exist.

Coins of the Republics of EgyptEdit

Commemorative coins (1955–present)Edit

Main article: Egyptian 1 pound coin/Commemorative
Egypt 1 pound comm. Ag

Some silver commemoratives from 1968 to 1982

In 1952 King Farouk was overthrown in a revolution by forces led by Muhammad Naguib (1901–1984) and Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918–1970). The king's infant son Fuad II (1952–) was then appointed king for a few months, but in 1953 the first Republic of Egypt was established and the monarch abolished, Fuad II being deposed and Naguib serving as the new government's first President. This republic lasted until 1958, the second year of Nasser's presidency, when the United Arab Republic was established from Egypt and Syria. In 1961 this entity was replaced by the current Arab Republic of Egypt, which continued to be known as the United Arab Republic until 1971.

Since 1955, the initial Republic and current Arab Republic have issued commemorative pound coins in precious metals in celebration of certain establishments, events, observances, organizations, and people. The most recent piece was made in 2011. Commemorative pounds coined in .720 fine silver from 1968 to 1973 weigh approximately 25 grams and measure 40 millimeters in diameter and 3 millimeters in thickness, whereas all later silver pieces of the denomination weigh 15 grams and measure 35 millimeters in diameter and 2 millimeters in thickness. All .875 gold coins are 24 millimeters in diameter. Specimens made until 1958 weigh 8.5 grams, and those produced in later years weigh a slightly lighter 8 grams. All of the commemorative pound coins have medallic alignment and reeded edges, and are round in shape. In 2015 a commemorative pound made for the completion of the New Suez Canal was introduced, with a brass-plated steel center and nickel-plated steel outer ring.

 
Commemorated subjects

Circulation coin (2005–2011)Edit

100 EPT

2005 coin

In 2006, a series of new Egyptian circulation coins consisting of 2005-dated pieces denominated at 50 piastres and 1 pound was introduced. These coins, favored by much of the Egyptian public, eventually replaced their banknote counterparts as the latter were phased out in 2008 and completely removed from circulation in 2010. The higher valued of the two, the first pound coin made for circulation since Farouk, was again struck annually from 2007 to 2011. It is bimetallic. Examples from the first year of production, 2005, have a cupronickel ring of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel, and a brass center of 75 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 5 percent nickel. Later-dated pieces are composed primarily of steel, the ring plated with a combination of 66 percents nickel and 33 percents copper, and the center plated with a brass alloy of 66 percents copper and 33 percents nickel. Coins of both compositions have a mass of 8.5 grams, a diameter of 25 millimeters, and a thickness of approximately 2 millimeters. They have medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape.

Displayed in the center of the coin's obverse is a facing illustration of the burial mask of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun (1341 BC–1323 BC), a well known artifact from the Pharaonic era of Ancient Egypt. A decorative border consisting of several connected flowers encircles the illustration of the mask in the silver colored outer ring. Inscribed on two lines in the middle of the reverse is the face value "جنيه ١"‎ (1 ginēh), the numeral written significantly larger than the accompanying word. Its English equivalent, "ONE POUND", appears below it in the ring, arched in a counterclockwise direction along the coin's periphery. The Gregorian date is shown in Eastern Arabic numerals to the left, followed by the letter "مـ" (mīm), an abbreviation for "ميلادية" (Mīlādīyyah), which identifies the Western calendar. The Islamic Hijri equivalent is written to the right of the English value, followed by a "هـ", (hāʾ), shortened for "هجرية" (Romanized: Hijrīyyah). Printed along the upper rim of the piece in a counterclockwise direction, commencing at the right periphery and concluding at the left, is the Arabic state title of the Arab Republic of Egypt, which reads "جمهورية مصر العربية" (Jumhūriyyat Maṣr al-ʿArabiyyah). Both rims of the piece are raised.

The total mintage of the circulation 1 pound coin is currently unknown. Only business strikes are known to exist.

Years
Gregorian Islamic
٢٠٠٧ (2007) ١٤٢٨ (1428)
٢٠٠٨ (2008) ١٤٢٩ (1429)
٢٠٠٩ (2009) ١٤٣٠ (1430)
٢٠١٠ (2010) ١٤٣١ (1431)
٢٠١١ (2011) ١٤٣٢ (1432)

ReferencesEdit

 v · d · e
Egyptian 1 pound coins
General Ottoman era coins (1838–1888) • Monarchical coins (1916–1938) • Current coin (2005–2010)
Commemorative 1955–19761977–19791980–19811982–19851986–19881989–19921994–19961997–19981999–20022003–20062007–2015
Other coins Sudanese imitation coin (1885)

Template:Egyptian pound

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