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Chadian 200 franc coin

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200 francs
General information
Country

Flag of Chad Chad

Value

200.00 Central African CFA francs

Years

1970

Measurements and composition
Mass

15 g

Composition

silver

Appearance
Shape

round

Obverse
Reverse
  • Map of Africa, state title, year (King coin)
  • Map of Africa, state title, value, year (de Gaulle and Nasser coins)
v · d · e

The 200 franc coin is a coin that was issued in three varieties by the Republic of Chad in 1970, on the occasion of the country's tenth anniversary of independence from France. Of the types, one commemorated American civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr.; another celebrated Charles de Gaulle, the President of France from 1959 to 1969; and another commemorated President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt. The pieces had face values equivalent to 200 Central African CFA francs.

Each of the coins is composed of silver and weighs approximately 15 grams. Also, each bears a reeded edge and is round in shape. The obverses of all pieces were designed by Belgian artist Roger Duterme (1919–1997).

CoinsEdit

Coin of Martin Luther King, Jr.Edit

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) was an African-American civil rights activist who was active during the 1950s and 1960s and was very influential in ending racial segregation in the United States. Among other peaceful acts of protest, he is most well known for delivering his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. For his acts, the Government of Chad selected him for one of its independence decennial commemorative coins, even though he did not necessarily have any connection with the country. A facing image of King is shown in the center of the reverse, separating the caption "M.L. KING" between the "L." and "KING". Below the "M.L." is the date "1929", representing the year of Martin Luther King's birth, and under the "KING" is the date "1968", the year in which King was assassinated. Both the caption and the years are written in small text and are engraved in the middle of the obverse. Directly below the image of Martin Luther King is the value "200 F". The date "1960", signifying the year Chad became independent, is inscribed at the left rim of the coin while the year "1970", representing the date of Chad's tenth anniversary, is written at the right periphery. Starting at the left side of the coin and arching upwards along the rim to end at the opposite side of the reverse is the French legend "LIBERTÉ PROGRÈS SOLIDARITÉ", which translates to English as "Liberty, progress, solidarity". The French state title "RÉPUBLIQUE DU TCHAD" (English: "Republic of Chad") is inscribed along the bottom periphery of the coin, starting near the "1" in the "1960" at the left side of the obverse and ending near the "0" in "1970" at the right side. An image of the African continent with the outline of Chad carved out, as well as portions of the Arabian Peninsula of Asia, is shown on the reverse. The French state title "RÉPUBLIQUE DU TCHAD" is shown arched around the rim above it, while the year "1970" is printed in small text at the very bottom of the coin.

In total, only 952 examples of this coin were made; of which, all were minted in proof quality.

Coin of Charles de GaulleEdit

Charles de Gaulle (1890–1970) was a French general and statesman who fought in World War I, and then in World War II as the leader of the Free French Forces, an organization dedicated to resisting the German rule in France during a period of occupation from 1940 to 1944. After the war, de Gaulle founded his own political party, the Rally of the French People, in 1947, and would eventually become the first president of the French Fifth Republic in 1959, a position he would hold until 1969. In commemoration of his life and actions, he was made the subject of one of Chad's three 200 franc coins. An older bust of Charles de Gaulle is shown facing ¾ right in the middle of the obverse, dividing the dates "1890", representing de Gaulle's year of birth, and "1970", signifying the date of his death. Like on the coin of Martin Luther King, Jr., these dates are written in small print in the middle of the coin, but are shown close to the coin's left and right peripheries. Arched around the rim below the likeness of de Gaulle is the caption "CHARLES DE GAULLE". The coin's reverse is virtually identical to that of the coin of Martin Luther King, but also features the value "200 F" in the area to the left of Southern Africa.

About 442 examples of the coin were produced, all in proof quality.

Coin of Gamal Abdel NasserEdit

Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918–1970) was a politician who served as the second President of Egypt from 1956 until his death in 1970. While criticized by detractors for his authoritarianism and human rights violations, Nasser has become an iconic figure and symbol of Arab dignity in the Arab world, particularly for his strides towards social justice, Arab unity, modernization efforts, and anti-imperialist efforts. As such, he was made the subject of one of the 1970 200 franc coins of Chad. An image of Nasser facing ¾ right is engraved in the middle of the obverse. Starting at the right side of the coin and arching along the rim underneath the likeness of the former Egyptian president to end at the left side of the reverse is the Arabic legend "الرئيس جمال عبد الناصر" (Romanized: al-Ra'īs Jamāl Abd al-Naser), which translates to English as "President Gamal Abdel Nasser". The reverse of the coin is identical to that of the piece of Charles de Gaulle, featuring the African continent with a portion of the Arabian Peninsula, the French state title "RÉPUBLIQUE DU TCHAD", the value, and the year of minting.

In total, only 435 examples of the coin were produced, all in proof quality.

ReferencesEdit

Template:Chad currency Template:CACFA

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