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Algerian 100 dinar coin

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100 dinars
Algeria 100 dinars 1993
Coin from 1993
General information
Country

Flag of Algeria Algeria

Used by

Flag of Algeria Algeria
Flag of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic

Value

100.00 dinars

Years

19922015 (AH1413–1436)

Measurements and composition
Mass

11 g

Diameter

29.5 mm

Thickness

2.3 mm

Composition

bimetallic; aluminum-bronze center, stainless steel ring

Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

coin

Edge

reeded (185 reeds)

Obverse
  • Arabian horse, Gregorian and Islamic years (1992-2013)
  • Stylized profile portraits, Gregorian date, state title, anniversary text (2002 commem.)
Reverse

Stylized value, bank title

v · d · e

The 100 dinar coin is a current circulation coin of the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria that has been issued since 1992. In addition, a circulating commemorative was made in 2002 on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Algeria's independence from France. Both pieces were issued by the Bank of Algeria, the Algerian central bank. They both currently hold a legal tender face value equivalent to 100.00 dinars in Algeria and also in the partially recognized Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic to the west.

CoinsEdit

General circulation piece (1992–present)Edit

In 1992, due to inflation, the Bank of Algeria introduced a new series of coinage consisting of denominations of ¼, ½, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dinars. The highest-valued coin of the series, the 100 dinar, has been produced frequently since, the most recent time in 2013. It is bimetallic, having a center composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and a ring made of stainless steel. The piece weighs approximately 11 grams and measures 29.5 millimeters in diameter and 2.3 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge with 185 reeds, and like most coins, is round in shape.

Featured in the middle of the coin's obverse is a right-facing illustration of a "Pur-sang" Arabian horse, which is primarily engraved within the aluminum-bronze center, although its lower next and mouth extend into the outer ring. The Islamic Hijri date of minting is inscribed in Western Arabic numerals along the upper curve of the center, above the depiction of the horse, followed by the Arabic letter "هـ‎" (hāʾ), abbreviated for "هجرية" (Romanized: Hijrīyyah). The corresponding Gregorian date is shown to the left, accompanied by the letter "مـ" (mīm), a shortened form of "ميلادية" (Romanized: Mīlādīyyah), which identifies the Western calendar. Displayed in the portions of the outer ring not occupied by the illustration of the horse is an ornamental design. Engraved on the reverse is the value "100 دينار" (mí'a dīnār). The numeral is printed stylistically in the aluminum-bronze center of the piece, the "1" represented by a palm tree in a southern Algerian doorway, the first "0" as the obverse of the piece (excluding the dates), and the second "0" as the mirror image of the obverse. Portions of the first and last components of the numeral extend into the stainless steel ring. The word "دينار" (dīnār) is written inside the ring at the bottom of the coin, arching around the periphery in a clockwise direction. Printed at the top of the coin in the ring is the Arabic title of the Bank of Algeria, "بنك الجزائر" (Romanized: Banīk al-Jazāʾir), written in a counterclockwise direction. The rims of both the obverse and reverse are raised.

The total mintage of the general issue Algerian 100 dinar coin is currently unknown. Only business strikes of this type exist, except for a handful of proofs produced in 1992.

Years
Islamic year Gregorian year
1413 1992
1414 1993
1415 1994
1417 1997
1418 1998
1420 1999
1421 2000
1422 2002
1423 2002
1423 2003
1424 2003
1425 2004
1428 2007
1430 2009
1431 2010
1432 2011
1434 2013
1436 2015

Fortieth anniversary commemorative (2002)Edit

After World War I, as nationalism increased in Algeria, then a French colony, some of the people there desired to break away from France and become independent. In 1954 the Algerian War began between the French and Algerian independence movements, and was concluded in 1962. The following Évian Accords granted self-determination for Algeria, and later that year most of its citizens voted to become independent in an referendum. On July 5, 1962, the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria broke away from its colonial owner. At the same date in 2002, the Bank of Algeria authorized the production of a commemorative 100 dinar coin marking the 40th anniversary of the event. Like the general issue piece, it is bimetallic with an aluminum-bronze center. The coin has the same measurements as well, weighing 11 grams and measuring 29.5 millimeters in diameter and 2.3 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge with 185 reeds, and is round in shape.

Displayed at the right side of the obverse, in portions of the aluminum-bronze center and stainless steel ring, is a stylized illustration of two profile portraits, one superimposing the other. Covering part of the illustration is the Arabic name of Algeria, "الجزائر" (al-Jazāʾir). The Western Arabic numeral "40" (ʾarbaʿūna), representing the 40th anniversary of Algerian independence, is written in the center of the piece, to the left of the portraits. Below it, arched around the edge of the center in a clockwise direction, is the date "2002 جويلية ‎5" (2002 Juliyya 5), translating as "July 5, 2002". The remainder of the center's edge is occupied by five five-pointed stars. Inscribed along the outer ring of the piece, starting at the top of the obverse and extending counterclockwise to the bottom, is the Arabic legend "الذكرى الأربعين لعيد الاستقلال والشباب" (Al-dikrā al-arbatūn l'īd al-istiqlāl wa al-shabāb), which translates to English as "Fortieth anniversary of the feast of independence and youth". The reverse of the coin is identical to that of the general issue coin, featuring the value "100 دينار" (mí'a dīnār). The numeral is printed in the middle of the piece with the "1" represented by a palm tree in a doorway, the first "0" as the obverse of the general issue 100 dirham coin, and the second as the mirror image of the general issue. The word "دينار" (dīnār) in the value is inscribed along the bottom periphery of the piece, while the Arabic title of the Bank of Algeria, "بنك الجزائر" (Romanized: Banīk al-Jazāʾir), appears at the top of the reverse.

The total mintage of the 2002 commemorative 100 dinar piece is currently unknown. Only business strikes were made.

ReferencesEdit

Template:Algerian dinar

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